“My soul is chaos, how can it be at all? There is everything in me: search and you will find out. I am a fossil dating from the beginning of the world: not all of its elements have completely crystallized, and initial chaos still shows through. I am absolute contradiction, climax of antinomies, the last limit of tension; in me anything is possible, for I am he who at the supreme moment, in front of absolute nothingness, will laugh.”
— Emil Cioran

“My manner of thinking, so you say, cannot be approved. Do you suppose I care? A poor fool indeed is he who adopts a manner of thinking for others!”
— Marquis de Sade

“To have her meals, and her daily walk, and her fill of novels, and to be left alone, was all that she asked of the gods.”
― Anthony Trollope

“Imagine the amazing good fortune of the generation that gets to see the end of the world. This is as marvelous as being there in the beginning.”
― Jean Baudrillard

“Man is and remains an animal. Here a beast of prey, there a housepet, but always an animal.” — Joseph Goebbels

“Since worship of fleshly things produces pleasure, there would then be a temple of glorious indulgence…” –LaVey

“That’s the problem with drinking, I thought, as I poured myself a drink. If something bad happens you drink in an attempt to forget; if something good happens you drink in order to celebrate; and if nothing happens you drink to make something happen.”
― Charles Bukowski

“Amnesia is not knowing who one is and wanting desperately to find out. Euphoria is not knowing who one is and not caring. Ecstasy is knowing exactly who one is – and still not caring.”
― Tom Robbins

Let those who suffer from the toils of samsara seek release: the perfect devotee does not suffer; for he can both visualize and experience life and the universe as the revelation of that Supreme Divine Force (shakti) with which he is in love, the all-comprehensive Divine Being in its cosmic aspect of playful, aimless display (lila) – which precipitates pain as well as joy, but in its bliss transcends them both.”
—Rohan Bastin

nāśivaṃ vidyate kvacit
“Nothing exists that is not Divine”

“The corpse, seen without God and outside of science, is the utmost of abjection. It is death infecting life.”
— Julia Kristeva, Powers of Horror

“Love of the people is the aristocrat’s vocation. The democrat does not love the people except during election season.”
– Nicolás Gómez Dávila

“The person who denies his own profound relationship with evil denies his own reality.” – Ursula K. LeGuin

“The Devil teaches women what they are – or they would teach it to the Devil if he did not know.”
― Jules-Amédée Barbey d’Aurevilly

“To be free of all authority, of your own and that of another, is to die to everything of yesterday, so that your mind is always fresh, always young, innocent, full of vigor and passion. It is only in that state that one learns and observes. And for this a great deal of awareness is required, actual awareness of what is going on inside yourself, without correcting it or telling it what it should or should not be, because the moment you correct it you have established another authority, a censor.” — J. Krishnamurti

“I am mad to be in love, I am not mad to be able to say so, I double my image: insane in my own eyes (I know my delirium), simply unreasonable in the eyes of someone else, to whom I quite sanely describe my madness: conscious of this madness, sustaining a discourse upon it.”
— Roland Barthes, A Lover’s Discourse: Fragments

“…there is, for me, no difference between writing a good poem and moving into sunlight against the body of a woman I love.”
— Audre Lorde

“I discovered for myself and by myself that there is no self to realize. That’s the realization I am talking about. It comes as a shattering blow. It hits you like a thunderbolt. You have invested everything in one basket, self-realization, and, in the end, suddenly you discover that there is no self to discover, no self to realize.”
— UG Krishnamurti

Let those who suffer from the toils of samsara seek release: the perfect devotee does not suffer; for he can both visualize and experience life and the universe as the revelation of that Supreme Divine Force (shakti) with which he is in love, the all-comprehensive Divine Being in its cosmic aspect of playful, aimless display (lila) – which precipitates pain as well as joy, but in its bliss transcends them both.”
—Rohan Bastin

“Adam and Eve entered the world naked and unashamed – naked and pure-minded. And no descendant of theirs has ever entered it otherwise. All have entered it naked, unashamed, and clean in mind. They entered it modest. They had to acquire immodesty in the soiled mind, there was no other way to get it.” — Mark Twain

“Since everything is but an illusion,
Perfect in being what it is,
Having nothing to do with good or bad,
Acceptance or rejection,
One might as well burst out laughing!”
-Longchen Rabjam (1308-1363)

“Oedipus was the most fortunate man in the world, for he
embraced his fate with pleasure.”

“But the true feminist deals out of a lesbian consciousness whether or not she ever sleeps with women.”
― Audre Lorde

“From the perspective I have sketched out above, the cultural making of meaning is not random, but neither is it stable. And the concept ‘culture-ideology’ conveys this. Culture includes all of the meaning-making systems, practices, and forms in a social formation—the prevailing truths as well as the contesting knowledges, residual and emergent forms of intelligibility, both formalized and informal, codified beliefs as well as inchoate structures of feeling. Those ways of knowing that legitimize and help to reproduce the kernel of human relations capitalism rely on comprise ideology.”

–Rosemary Hennessy

“If this is your God, he’s not very impressive. He’s got so many psychological problems; he’s so insecure. He demands worship every seven days. He goes out and creates faulty humans and then blames them for his own mistakes. He’s a pretty poor excuse for a supreme being.”

–— Spock, The God Thing: Gene Roddenberry’s Lost Star Trek Novel rejected by Paramount in 1975.

“In modern states, the citizen is politically impotent. A citizen, it is true, may complain, make suggestions, or cause disruptions, but in the ancient world these were privileges that belonged to any slave.”

–Mark Mirabello

“Paganism does not reproach Christianity for defending the weak who are unjustly oppressed. It reproaches it for exalting them in their weakness and viewing it as the sign of their election and their title to glory; it reproaches Christianity for not helping them to become strong. So it is not a question of opposing the strong versus the weak—today, in any event, it is paganism that is weak and Judeo-Christian monotheism that is strong—but purely and simply of opposing a system of remaining weak with a system of becoming strong.

It is also a question of making a world that is not a vale of tears, nor a theater of shadows, nor a stage where man with erratic happiness acts out his salvation, but the natural field of self-expansion for a man capable of asserting his autonomy and establishing himself as his own project.” – Alain de Benoist

“Morality has become so complex and contradictory because its values no longer constitute themselves in the order of life but have crystallized in a transcendental region only feebly connected to life’s vital and irrational forces. How does one go about founding a morality?

I’m so sick of the word “good”; it is so stale and vapid! Morality tells you to work for the triumph of goodness! And how? Through the fulfillment of one’s duties, respect, sacrifice. These are just empty words: in front of naked reality, moral principles are void, so much so that one wonders whether life without them would not be preferable.”

–Cioran

“Men are so necessarily mad, that not to be mad would amount to another form of madness.”

“Necessarily because the existential dualism makes an impossible situation, an excruciating dilemma. Mad because, as we shall see, everything that man does in his symbolic world is an attempt to deny and overcome his grotesque fate. He literally drives himself into a blind obliviousness with social games, psychological tricks, personal preoccupations so far removed from the reality of his situation that they are forms of madness — agreed madness, shared madness, disguised and dignified madness, but madness all the same.”

–Ernest Becker, Denial of Death

“Well, tell me, Therese, merely because these idiots talk drivel about the erection of a wretched chimera and about the mode of serving him, must it follow that an intelligent man has got to renounce the certain and present happiness of life; like Aesop’s dog, must he abandon the bone for the shadow and renounce his real joys for hallucinations?

No, Therese, no, there is no God, Nature sufficeth unto herself; in no wise hath she need of an author; once supposed, that author is naught but a decayed version of herself.”

–Marquis de Sade

“If this is your God, he’s not very impressive. He’s got so many psychological problems; he’s so insecure. He demands worship every seven days. He goes out and creates faulty humans and then blames them for his own mistakes. He’s a pretty poor excuse for a supreme being.”

–— Spock, The God Thing: Gene Roddenberry’s Lost Star Trek Novel rejected by Paramount in 1975.

“Anarchism is the only philosophy which brings to man the consciousness of himself; which maintains that God, the State, and society are non-existent, that their promises are null and void, since they can be fullfilled only through man’s subordination.”

-Emma Goldma

“He who dies before He dies does not die when He dies.”

-German saying

“Yet I marvel more that, society being what it is, certain people have ventured to conceive of another one which is totally different. What could be the cause of so much naiveté, or of so much inanity?

We act only under the fascination of the impossible: which is to say that a society incapable of generating and of dedicating itself to-a utopia is threatened with fossilisation and collapse. But utopia, let’s remember, signifies ‘no where’. And from where are those cities which evil doesn’t touch, where we bless labour and where no one fears death? We are compelled to a felicity formed of geometrical idylls, of regulated ecstasies, of a thousand nauseating wonders as the ones necessarily presented in a world which is perfect, fabricated.

Utopia is the grotesque en rose, the need to associate happiness that is, the improbable- with becoming, and to coerce an optimistic aerial vision to the point where it rejoins its own source: the very cynicism it sought to combat. In sum, a monstrous fantasy.”

— Emil Cioran

“There is of course love, and I have always asked myself: when we have figured it all out, when our gaze has pierced through everything, how can we still be infatuated with anything at all?

Yet, such a thing happens. It’s even what in life is real and interesting. We can doubt of absolutely everything, declare ourselves to be nihilists and yet fall in love like the greatest fool. This theoretical impossibility of passion, and which real life constantly evades, renders life to have an indisputable, irresistible charm.

We suffer, we laugh of our sufferings, and this fundamental contradiction finally might be what makes life still worth living. The fact of living is something so extraordinary, precisely when we have seen things as they truly are; because this life which is totally depreciated, let’s say, theoretically, somehow appears extraordinary at the practical level.

To live against [or despite] the evidence: every moment becomes a sort of heroism.”

—Emil Cioran

“There is of course love, and I have always asked myself: when we have figured it all out, when our gaze has pierced through everything, how can we still be infatuated with anything at all?

Yet, such a thing happens. It’s even what in life is real and interesting. We can doubt of absolutely everything, declare ourselves to be nihilists and yet fall in love like the greatest fool. This theoretical impossibility of passion, and which real life constantly evades, renders life to have an indisputable, irresistible charm.

We suffer, we laugh of our sufferings, and this fundamental contradiction finally might be what makes life still worth living. The fact of living is something so extraordinary, precisely when we have seen things as they truly are; because this life which is totally depreciated, let’s say, theoretically, somehow appears extraordinary at the practical level.

To live against [or despite] the evidence: every moment becomes a sort of heroism.”

—Emil Cioran

“The idea that the goal is far off, far beyond nature, attracting us all towards it, has to be brought nearer and nearer, without degrading or degenerating it.

The God of heaven becomes the God in nature,
and the God in nature becomes the God who is nature,
and the God who is nature becomes the God within this temple of the body,
and the God dwelling in the temple of the body at last becomes the temple itself, becomes the soul and man — and there it reaches the last words it can teach.”

—Vivekananda

“I have tried to show how religion, the backbone of civilisation, hardens into a Church that is unacceptable to Outsiders, and the Outsiders — the men who strive to become visionaries — become the Rebels. In our case, the scientific progress that has brought us closer than ever before to conquering the problems of civilisation, has also robbed us of spiritual drive; and the Outsider is doubly a rebel: a rebel against the Established Church , a rebel against the unestablished church of materialism.”

–Colin Wilson

“If one could reduce the portrayal of Cioran to one short paragraph, then one must depict him as an author who sees in the modern veneration of the intellect a blueprint for spiritual gulags and the uglification of the world. Indeed, for Cioran, man’s task is to wash himself in the school of existential futility, for futility is not hopelessness; futility is a reward for those wishing to rid themselves of the epidemic of life and the virus of hope. Probably, this picture best befits the man who describes himself as a fanatic without any convictions–a stranded accident in the cosmos who casts nostalgic looks towards his quick disappearance.

To be free is to rid oneself forever from the notion of reward; to expect nothing from people or gods; to renounce not only this world and all worlds, but salvation itself; to break up even the idea of this chain among chains.”

– Tomislav Sunic

“The amoral style leads to a homeopathic ascetic: this weakens the Evil of sin, in that they are committed thoughtfully and ironically, as if by quota: the Gnostic embraces the sin and experiences thereby a critical decay in his own body, finally to climb out of the gutter fully burnt out. — The world is a pornographic purgatory, from which to filter the immaculate Pneumata.

The abstaining style, in contrast, applies allopathic methods against the sickness of the World: against the poisons of the cosmos it administers immediate flight from the world as an antidote. Civil disobedience against the lower body, general strike against the astral works, bathings in tears, fasting of the heart.”

–Peter Sloterdijk

“What liberates is the knowledge of who we were, what we became; where we were, whereinto we have been thrown; whereto we speed, wherefrom we are redeemed; what birth is, and what rebirth.”

–Writings of Theodotus

“I am a vessel more precious than the woman that made ye. Your
mother does not know her origin, but I know myself and know whence
I come. I invoke the incorruptible Sophia who dwells in the Father
and is the mother of your mother. . . . But a woman born of woman
brought ye forth, without knowing her own mother and believing that
she was from herself: but I invoke her mother.”

(Iren. I. 21. 5)

“Neither seek nor avoid; take what comes. It is liberty to be affected by nothing. Do not merely endure; be unattached.”

–Swami Vivekananda

“There is no God separate from you, no God higher than you, the real ‘you’. All the gods are little beings to you, all the ideas of God and Father in heaven are but your own reflection. God Himself is your image. ‘God created man after His own image.’ That is wrong. Man creates God after his own image. That is right. Throughout the universe we are creating gods after our own image. We create the god and fall down at his feet and worship him; and when this dream comes, we love it!”

― Swami Vivekananda

“Yet even within this feel-good tome, a solitary voice of dissent stood out. They’d made the mistake of putting the question to Oswald Spengler. Spengler’s reply came back a resounding NO. Even if most men truly desire peace, he reasoned, imposing it as some false condition would constitute an impossibility. However many intelligent and supposedly enlightened people might desire it, they would always be outnumbered by those who had far less and wanted far more. Those who felt no compunction for taking what they want–or felt they deserved by means of force and violence. This, he reasoned, is how it always has been, and shall remain.”

–Boyd Rice

“So that’s the tragedy of our predicament. In order to fully exist as individuals we need the fiction of a Big Other. There must be an agency which, as it were, registers our predicament. An agency where the truth of ourselves will be inscribed. Accept that. An agency to which to confess. But what if there is no such agency?

They discovered the truth of what Jacques Lacan claims: there is no Big Other.

There may be a virtual Big Other to whom you cannot confess. There may be a real other but it’s never the virtual one.

We are alone.”

–Zizek

“God, conquered, will become Satan; Satan, conquering, will become God. May the fates spare me this terrible lot; I love the Hell which formed my genius. I love the Earth where I have done some good, if it be possible to do any good in this fearful world where beings live but by rapine. Now, thanks to us, the god of old is dispossessed of his terrestrial empire, and every thinking being on this globe disdains him or knows him not. But what matter that men should be no longer submissive to Ialdabaoth if the spirit of Ialdabaoth is still in them; if they, like him, are jealous, violent, quarrelsome, and greedy, and the foes of the arts and of beauty?

What matter that they have rejected the ferocious Demiurge, if they do not hearken to the friendly demons who teach all truths; to Dionysus, Apollo, and the Muses? As to ourselves, celestial spirits, sublime demons, we have destroyed Ialdabaoth, our Tyrant, if in ourselves we have destroyed Ignorance and Fear.

We were conquered because we failed to understand that Victory is a Spirit, and that it is in ourselves and in ourselves alone that we must attack and destroy Ialdabaoth.”

–Anatole France, The Revolt of the Angels

“The battle for the mind of North America will be fought in the video arena: the Videodrome. The television screen is the retina of the mind’s eye. Therefore, the television screen is part of the physical structure of the brain. Therefore, whatever appears on the television screen emerges as raw experience for those who watch it. Therefore, television is reality, and reality is less than television.”

“The concept of humanity is an especially useful ideological instrument of imperialist expansion, and in its ethical-humanitarian form it is a specific vehicle of economic imperialism. Here one is reminded of a somewhat modified expression of Proudhon’s: whoever invokes humanity wants to cheat. To confiscate the word humanity, to invoke and monopolize such a term probably has certain incalculable effects, such as denying the enemy the quality of being human and declaring him to be an outlaw of humanity; and a war can thereby be driven to the most extreme inhumanity.”

— Carl Schmitt

“Aesthetics is born as a discourse of the body. It is a form of cognition, achieved through taste, touch, hearing, seeing, smell — the whole corporeal sensorium. This physical-cognitive apparatus with its qualitatively autonomous, nonfungible sensors (the ears cannot smell, the mouth cannot see) is “out front” of the mind, encountering the world prelinguistically, hence prior not only to logic but to meaning as well…. One might rather place aesthetics within the field of animal instincts or our creaturely life”

—Terry Eagleton

“The New Freewoman is not for the advancement of Woman, but for the empowering of individuals – men and women; it is not to set women free, but to demonstrate the fact that “freeing” is the individual’s affair and must be done first-hand, and that individual power is the first step thereto; it is not to bring new thoughts to individuals, but to set the thinking mechanism to the task of destroying thoughts – to make plain that thinking has no merit in itself, but is a machine, of which the purpose is not to create something, but to liberate something: not to create thoughts but to set free life impulses.”

—Dora Marsden

“The wise in every age conclude,
What Pyrrho taught and Hume renewed,
That dogmatists are fools”

“The Left-Hand Path can be identified by the following five characteristics: the ideology of individualism; the view of the human being as a psycho-physical totality; the appraisal of life in the here-and-now; the goal of self-deification; and an antinomian stance toward conventional religion and culture.”

“The philosophy of rationalism has misunderstood the nature of man, the nature of the social world, and the nature of reason itself. It does not see that man’s nature has three dimensions: biological, rational, and spiritual. By neglecting the biological impulses and spiritual aspirations of man, it misconstrues the function reason fulfills within the whole of human existence; it distorts the problem of ethics, especially in the political field; and it perverts the natural sciences into an instrument of social salvation for which neither their own nature nor the nature of the social world fits them.”

― Hans J. Morgenthau

“If we are taken over by craving, no matter who or what is before us, all we can see is how it might satisfy our needs. This kind of thirst contracts our body and mind into a profound trance. We move through the world with a kind of tunnel vision that prevents us from enjoying what is in front of us. The color of an autumn leaves or a passage of poetry merely amplifies the feeling that there is a gaping hole in our life. The smile of a child only reminds us that we are painfully childless. We turn away from simple pleasures because our craving compels us to seek more intense stimulation or numbing relief.”

― Tara Brach

“We bear within us a reticent executioner, an unrealized criminal. And those who lack boldness to acknowledge their homicidal tendencies , murder in dreams, people their nightmares with corpses. Before an absolute tribunal, only angels would be acquitted.

For there has never been a human being who has not–at least unconsciously–desired the death of another human being. Each of us drags after him a cemetery of friends and enemies; and it matters lttle whether this graveyard is relegated to the heart’s abyss or projected to the surface of our desires.”

–St. Cioran

“Why don’t I commit suicide? Because I am as sick of death as I am of life. I should be cast into a flaming cauldron! Why am I on this earth? I feel the need to cry out, to utter a savage scream that will set the world atremble with dread. I am like a lightning bolt ready to set the world ablaze and swallow it all in the flames of my nothingness. I am the most monstrous being in history, the beast of the apocalypse full of fire and darkness, of aspirations and despair.

I am the beast with a contorted grin, contracting down to illusion and dilating toward infinity, both growing and dying, delightfully suspended between hope for nothing and despair of everything, brought up among perfumes and poisons, consumed with love and hatred, killed by lights and shadows. My symbol is the death of light and the flame of death. Sparks die in me only to be reborn as thunder and lightning. Darkness itself glows in me. ”

—Cioran

“Men generally work too much to be themselves. Work is a curse which man has turned into pleasure. To work for work’s sake, to enjoy a fruitless endeavor, to imagine that you can fulfill yourself through assiduous labor—all that is disgusting and incomprehensible. Permanent and uninterrupted work dulls, trivializes, and depersonalizes. Work displaces man’s center of interest from the subjective to the objective realm of things. In consequence, man no longer takes an interest in his own destiny but focuses on facts and things.

What should be an activity of permanent transfiguration becomes a means of exteriorization, of abandoning one’s inner self. In the modern world, work signifies a purely external activity; man no longer makes himself through it, he makes things. That each of us must have a career, must enter upon a certain form of life which probably does not suit us, illustrates work’s tendency to dull the spirit. Instead of living for himself—not selfishly but growing spiritually—man has become the wretched, impotent slave of external reality.”

–Cioran, Degradation through Work.

“Had Jesus not died on the cross, Christianity would not have triumphed. Mortals doubt everything except death. Christ’s death was for them the ultimate proof of the validity of Christian principles. Jesus could have easily escaped crucifixion or could have given in to the Devil! He who has not made a pact with the Devil should not live, because the Devil symbolizes life better than God. If I have any regrets, it is that the Devil has rarely tempted me . . .but then neither has God loved me. Christians have not yet understood that God is farther removed from them than they are from Him.

I can very well imagine God being bored with men who only know how to beg, exasperated by the triviality of his creation, equally disgusted with both heaven and earth. And I see him taking flight into nothingness, like Jesus escaping from the cross…What would have happened if the Roman soldiers had listened to Jesus’ plea, had taken him off the cross and let him escape? He would certainly not have gone to some other part of the world to preach but only to die, alone, without people’s sympathy and tears.

And even supposing that, because of his pride, he did not beg for freedom, I find it difficult to believe that this thought did not obsess him. He must have truly believed that he was the son of God. His belief notwithstanding, he could not have helped doubting or being gripped by the fear of death at the moment of his supreme sacrifice. On the cross, Jesus had moments when, if he did not doubt that he was the son of God, he regretted it. He accepted death uniquely so that his ideas would triumph.”

–Cioran

“The great philosophical systems are actually no more than brilliant tautologies. What advantage is it to know that the nature of being consists in the “will to live,” in the “idea,” or in the whim of God or of Chemistry? A mere proliferation of words, subtle displacements of meanings. “What is” loathes the verbal embrace, and our inmost experience reveals us nothing beyond the privileged and inexpressible moment.”

(from “Farewell to Philosophy” in A Short History of Decay)

“Pain and pleasure, indivisible.”

“Wolves which batten upon lambs, lambs consumed by wolves, the strong who immolate the weak, the weak victims of the strong: there you have Nature, there you have her intentions, there you have her scheme: a perpetual action and reaction, a host of vices, a host of virtues, in one word, a perfect equilibrium resulting from the equality of good and evil on earth.”

–Marquis de Sade

“Talk of world peace is heard today only among the white peoples, and not among the much more numerous coloured races. This is a perilous state of affairs. When individual thinkers and idealists talk of peace, as they have done since time immemorial, the effect is negligible. But when whole peoples become pacifistic it is a symptom of senility. Strong and unspent races are not pacifistic. To adopt such a position is to abandon the future, for the pacifist ideal is a terminal condition that is contrary to the basic facts of existence. As long as man continues to evolve, there will be wars…”
― Oswald Spengler

“It is extreme evil to depart from the company of the living before you die.”

–Seneca

“On the heights of despair, the passion for the absurd is the only thing that can still throw a demonic light on chaos.

When all the current reasons—moral, esthetic, religious, social, and so on—no longer guide one’s life, how can one sustain life without succumbing to nothingness? Only by a connection with the absurd, by love of absolute uselessness, loving something which does not have substance but which simulates an illusion of life. I live because the mountains do not laugh and the worms do not sing.

The passion for the absurd can grow only in a man who has exhausted everything, yet is still capable of undergoing awesome transfigurations. For one who has lost everything there is nothing left in life except the passion of the absurd. What else in life could still move such a person? What seductions? Some say: self-sacrifice for humanity, the public good, the cult of the beautiful, and so forth. I like only those people who have done away with all that—even for a short time. Only they have lived in an absolute manner. Only they have the right to speak about life. You can recover love or serenity. But you recover it through heroism, not ignorance.

An existence which does not hide a great madness has no value. How is it different from the existence of a stone, a piece of wood, or something rotten? And yet I tell you: you must hide a great madness in order to want to become stone, wood, or rot.

Only when you have tasted all the poisoning sweetness of the absurd are you fully purified, because only then will you have pushed negation to its final expression. And are not all final expressions absurd?”

–Emil Cioran, Passion for the Absurd

“I am not a frequenter of the schools, but of the woods; a solitary wanderer, careless of sects but greedy of truth. Distrustful of my own faculties, lest I should be involved in errors, I embrace doubt itself as truth. I have thus gradually become an Academic; to myself ascribing nothing, affirming nothing, and doubting all things excepting those in which doubt is sacrilege.”

–Francesco Petrarca

“A dictator has the soul of a christhood executioner, stained with blood and sky. The crowd wants to obey him. The most sublime visions and ecstasies, communicated through angel flutes, can’t start it like a military march. Adam was only a warrant officer.”

–Cioran

“My eyes, however strong or weak they may be, can see only a certain distance, and it is within the space encompassed by this distance that I live and move, the line of this horizon constitutes my immediate fate, in great things and small, from which I cannot escape. Around every being there is described a similar concentric circle, which has a mid-point and is peculiar to him. Our ears enclose us within a comparable circle, and so does our sense of touch. Now, it is by these horizons, within which each of us encloses his senses as if behind prison walls, that we measure the world, we say that this is near and that far, this is big and that small, this is hard and that soft: this measuring we call sensation — and it is all of it an error!”

—Nietzsche

“Men’s minds need a simple truth, an answer which delivers them from their questions, a gospel, a tomb. The moments of refinement conceal a death-principle: nothing is more fragile than subtlety.”

–St Cioran

“Why can’t we stay closed up inside of ourselves? Why do we chase after expression and form, trying to deliver ourselves of our precious concern or “meanings,” desperately attempting to organize what is after all a rebellious and chaotic process? Wouldn’t it be more creative simply to surrender our inner fluidity without any intention of objectifying it, intimately and voluptuously soak in in our own inner turmoil and struggle? Then we would feel with much richer intensity the whole inner growth of spiritual experience. All kinds of insights would blend and flourish in a fertile effervescence. A sensation of actuality and spiritual content would be born, like the rise of a wave or a musical phrase. To be tormented by a sense of inner infinity, means to live so intensely that you feel you are about to die of life.

Such a feeling is so rare and strange that we would live it out with shouts. I feel I could die of life, and I ask myself if it makes any sense to look for an explanation. When your entire spiritual past vibrates inside you with a supreme tension, when a sense of total presence resurrects buried experiences and you lose your normal rhythm, then, from the heights of life, you are caught by death without the fear which normally accompanies it. It is a feeling similar to that experienced by lovers on the heights of happiness, when they have a passing but intense intimation of death or when a premonition of betrayal haunts their budding love.”

–St. Cioran

“Christianity — and this is its greatest merit — mitigated in a measure that brutal Germanic lust for war; it could not destroy it, however. Should that subduing talisman, the cross, be shattered some day: there will then burst forth again the frenzied madness of the ancient warriors; that insane Berserk rage of which Nordic bards have spoken and sung so often. The talisman is decaying and the day will come when it shall woefully be torn asunder. The old stone gods will then rise from the long-forgotten ruins, rub the thousand-year-old dust from their eyes, and Thor, leaping to life, shall lay waste to the gothic cathedrals with his giant hammer….

Do not smile at my advice — the advice of a dreamer who warns you against Kantians, Fichteans, and philosophers of nature. Do not smile at the visionary who anticipates the same revolution in the realm of the visible as has taken place in the spiritual. Thought precedes action as lightning precedes thunder. German thunder…comes rolling somewhat slowly, but…its crash…will be unlike anything before in the history of the world.”

– Heinrich Heine, 1833

“If I could, I would drive the entire world to agony to achieve a radical purification of life; I would set a fire burning insidiously at the roots of life, not to destroy them but to give them a new and different sap, a new heat. The fire I would set to the world would not bring ruin but cosmic transfiguration. In this way life would adjust to higher temperatures and would cease to be an environment propitious to mediocrity. And maybe in this dream, death too would cease to be immanent in life.”

–St. Cioran

“Of every event in our life we can say only for one moment that it is; for ever after, that it was. Every evening we are poorer by a day. It might, perhaps, make us mad to see how rapidly our short span of time ebbs away; if it were not that in the furthest depths of our being we are secretly conscious of our share in the inexhaustible spring of eternity, so that we can always hope to find life in it again.

Considerations of the kind touched on above might indeed, lead us to embrace the belief that the greatest wisdom is to make the enjoyment of the present the supreme object of life; because that is the only reality, all else being merely the play of thought. On the other hand, such a course might just as well be called the greatest folly: for that which in the next moment exists no more, and vanishes utterly, like a dream, can never be worth a serious effort.”

—Schopenhauer

“So here he lies at the last. The deathbed convert. The pious debauchee. Could not dance a half measure, could I?

Give me wine, I drain the dregs and toss the empty bottle at the world. Show me our Lord Jesus in agony and I mount the cross and steal his nails for my own palms.

There I go, shuffling from the world. My dribble fresh upon the bible. I look upon a pinhead and I see angels dancing. Well? Do you like me now? Do you like me now? Do you like me now?”

“Idolaters by instinct, we convert the objects of our dreams and our interests into the Unconditional… Even when he turns from religion, man remains subject to it; depleting himself to create fake gods, he then feverishly adopts them: his need for fiction, for mythology triumphs over evidence and absurdity alike.”

— Emil Cioran, A Short History of Decay

“The spiritualization of sensuality is called love: it represents a great triumph over Christianity. Another triumph is our spiritualization of hostility. It consists in a profound appreciation of the value of having enemies: in short, it means acting and thinking in the opposite way from that which has been the rule. The church always wanted the destruction of its enemies; we, we immoralists and Antichristians, find our advantage in this, that the church exists.

In the political realm too, hostility has now become more spiritual — much more sensible, much more thoughtful, much more considerate. Almost every party understands how it is in the interest of its own self-preservation that the opposition should not lose all strength; the same is true of power politics. A new creation in particular — the new Reich, for example — needs enemies more than friends: in opposition alone does it feel itself necessary, in opposition alone does it become necessary.”

—Nietzsche

“If there is a meaning in life at all, then there must be a meaning in suffering. Suffering is an ineradicable part of life, even as fate and death. Without suffering and death human life cannot be complete.

The way in which a man accepts his fate and all the suffering it entails, the way in which he takes up his cross, gives him ample opportunity — even under the most difficult circumstances — to add a deeper meaning to his life. It may remain brave, dignified and unselfish. Or in the bitter fight for self-preservation he may forget his human dignity and become no more than an animal. Here lies the chance for a man either to make use of or to forgo the opportunities of attaining the moral values that a difficult situation may afford him. And this decides whether he is worthy of his sufferings or not. Such men are not only in concentration camps. Everywhere man is confronted with fate, with the chance of achieving something through his own suffering.”

—Viktor Frankl

“Human sexuality is, quite apart from Christian repressions, a highly questionable phenomena, and belongs, at least potentially, among the extreme rather than ordinary experiences of humanity. Tamed as it may be, sexuality remains one of the demonic forces in human consciousness –pushing us at intervals close to taboo and dangerous desires, which range from the impulse to commit sudden arbitrary violence upon another person to the voluptuous yearning for extinction of one’s consciousness, for death itself.

Even on the level of simple physical sensation and mood, making love surely resembles having an epileptic fit at least as much, if not more, than it does eating a meal or conversing with someone. Everyone has felt (at least in fantasy) the erotic glamor of physical cruelty and erotic lure in things that are vile and repulsive. These phenomena form a part of the genuine spectrum of sexuality, and if they are not to be written off as mere neurotic aberrations , the picture looks different from the one promoted by enlightened public opinion, and less simple.”

–Susan Sontag

“Why can’t we stay closed up inside of ourselves? Why do we chase after expression and form, trying to deliver ourselves of our precious concern or “meanings,” desperately attempting to organize what is after all a rebellious and chaotic process? Wouldn’t it be more creative simply to surrender our inner fluidity without any intention of objectifying it, intimately and voluptuously soak in in our own inner turmoil and struggle? Then we would feel with much richer intensity the whole inner growth of spiritual experience. All kinds of insights would blend and flourish in a fertile effervescence. A sensation of actuality and spiritual content would be born, like the rise of a wave or a musical phrase. To be tormented by a sense of inner infinity, means to live so intensely that you feel you are about to die of life.

Such a feeling is so rare and strange that we would live it out with shouts. I feel I could die of life, and I ask myself if it makes any sense to look for an explanation. When your entire spiritual past vibrates inside you with a supreme tension, when a sense of total presence resurrects buried experiences and you lose your normal rhythm, then, from the heights of life, you are caught by death without the fear which normally accompanies it. It is a feeling similar to that experienced by lovers on the heights of happiness, when they have a passing but intense intimation of death or when a premonition of betrayal haunts their budding love.”

–St. Cioran

“Men’s minds need a simple truth, an answer which delivers them from their questions, a gospel, a tomb. The moments of refinement conceal a death-principle: nothing is more fragile than subtlety.”

–St Cioran

“We are not in control. Every now and then life likes to reiterate that little point. Some people find such reminders disconcerting.

Some people anchor themselves to something larger. Religion, art, justice, anything they deem significant in a life that’s not.

I suppose I admire the sheer force of their denial, and besides–I don’t worry about people who take cover when the sky falls down. I worry about the ones who don’t even let it interrupt their day.”–catwoman

“I suddenly realized what madness really is, it’s believing in a reality no one else believes in…and acting as if there isn’t any other.”  –arkham

“What, then, is truth? A mobile army of metaphors, metonyms, and anthropomorphisms—in short, a sum of human relations which have been enhanced, transposed, and embellished poetically and rhetorically, and which after long use seem firm, canonical, and obligatory to a people: truths are illusions about which one has forgotten that this is what they are.”

—Nietzsche

“And what is an authentic madman? It is a man who preferred to become mad, in the socially accepted sense of the word, rather than forfeit a certain superior idea of human honor. So society has strangled in its asylums all those it wanted to get rid of or protect itself from, because they refused to become its accomplices in certain great nastinesses. For a madman is also a man whom society did not want to hear and whom it wanted to prevent from uttering certain intolerable truths.”

—- Antonin Artaud

“I destroy because – for me – everything that proceeds from reason is untrustworthy. I believe only in the evidence of what stirs my marrow, not in the evidence of what addresses itself to my reason. I have found levels in the realm of the nerve.”

—Antonin Artaud

“A civilization begins to decline the moment Life becomes its sole obsession.”

― Emil Cioran

“Our world is sick, boy. Very sick. A virus got in a long time ago and we’ve got so used to its effects, we’ve forgotten what it was like before we came ill. I’m talking about cities, see?

Human cultures were originally homeostatic, they existed in a self-sustaining equilibrium with no notions of time and progress, like we’ve got. Then the city virus got in. No-one’s really sure where it came from or who brought it to us, but like all viral organisms, its one directive is to use up all the available resources in producing copies of itself. More and more copies until there’s no raw material left and the host body overwhelmed, can only die.”

–Invisibles

“The word female brings up in his mind a saraband of imagery – a vast, round ovum engulfs and castrates the agile spermatozoan; the monstrous and swollen termite queen rules over the enslaved males; the female praying mantis and the spider, satiated with love, crush and devour their partners; the bitch in heat runs through the alleys, trailing behind her a wake of depraved odours; the she-monkey presents posterior immodestly and then steals away with hypocritical coquetry; and the most superb wild beasts – the tigress, the lioness, the panther – bed down slavishly under the imperial embrace of the male. Females sluggish, eager, artful, stupid, callous, lustful, ferocious, abased – man projects them all at once upon woman. And the fact is that she is a female.

But if we are willing to stop thinking in platitudes, two questions are immediately posed: what does the female denote in the animal kingdom? And what particular kind of female is manifest in woman?”

–Simone de Beauvoir

“Let us imagine a rising generation with this bold vision, this heroic desire for the magnificent, let us imagine the valiant step of these dragon-slayers, the proud daring with which they turn their backs on all the effeminate doctrines of optimism that they may “live resolutely,” wholly, and fully: would it not be necessary for the tragic man of this culture, with his self-discipline of seriousness and terror, to desire a new art, the art of metaphysical comfort—namely, tragedy…”

—Nietzsche

“Life always occurs in a tumult with no apparent cohesion, but it only finds its grandeur and reality in ecstasy and ecstatic love. He who wants to ignore or neglect ecstasy is a being whose thought has been reduced to analysis. Existence is not only an agitated void: it is a dance that forces us to dance fanatically. The idea that doesn’t have as object a dead fragment exists internally in the same way as does a flame.”

— Georges Bataille

“Moral certainty is always a sign of cultural inferiority. The more uncivilized the man, the surer he is that he knows precisely what is right and what is wrong. The truly civilized man is always skeptical and tolerant, in this field as in all others. His culture is based on ‘I am not too sure.”

-H.L. Mencken

“We know of no other means to imbue exhausted peoples, as strongly and surely as every great war does, with that raw energy of the battleground, that deep impersonal hatred, that murderous cold-bloodedness with a good conscience, that communal, organized ardor in destroying the enemy, that proud indifference to great losses, to one’s own existence and to that of one’s friends, that muted, earthquake like convulsion of the soul.

Afterward, if conditions are favorable, the brooks and streams that have broken forth, rolling stones and all kinds of debris along with them, and destroying the meadows of delicate cultures, will start to turn the wheels in the workshops of the spirit with new strength. Culture absolutely cannot do without passions, vices, and acts of malice.”

–Nietzsche

“The only cosmic reality is mindless, undeviating fate — automatic, unmoral, uncalculating inevitability.

As human beings, our only sensible scale of values is one based on the lessening of the agony of existence. That plan is most deserving of praise which most ably fosters the creation of the objects and con­ditions best adapted to diminish the pain of living for those most sen­sitive to its depressing ravages.”

–Lovecraft

“Democracy is the theory that intelligence is dangerous. It assumes that no idea can be safe until those who can’t understand it have approved it. It defines truth as anything which at least fifty-one men in every hundred believe. Thus it is firmly committed to the doctrines that one bath a week is enough, that “I seen” is the past tense of “I see,” and that Friday is an unlucky day.”

— H.L. Mencken

“Pessimism produces kindness. The disillusioned philosopher is even more tolerant than the priggish bourgeois idealist with his sentimen­tal and extravagant notions of human dignity and destiny.”

–Lovecraft

“It must be remembered that there is no real reason to expect any­thing in particular from mankind; good and evil are local expedients — or their lack — and not in any sense cosmic truths or laws. We call a thing “good” because it promotes certain petty human conditions that we happen to like — whereas it is just as sensible to assume that all humanity is a noxious pest which should be eradicated like rats or gnats for the good of the planet or of the universe.

There are no absolute values in the whole blind tragedy of mechanistic Nature — nothing is either good or bad except as judged from an absurdly limited point of view.”

–Lovecraft

“That part of man which is part barbarian and untamed will never die. Throughout every vicissitude of time, the barbarian survives; civilized man forgets how to survive. There will always be the triumph of the barbarian over civilized man.”

–Robert E Howard

“Aristocracy alone is capable of creating thoughts and objects of value. Everyone, I fancy, will admit that such a state must precede democracy or ochlocracy in order to build the original culture. Fewer are willing to admit the cognate truth that democracies and ochlocracies merely subsist parasitically on the aristocracies they overthrow, gradually using up the aesthetic and intellectual resources which autocracy bequeathed them and which they never could have created for themselves.

The rate of squandering depends upon the completeness of the departure from aristocracy. Where the old spirit lingers, the process of deteriora­tion may be very slow indeed — certain belated additions compensating for the decline. But where the rabble gain full sway taste is certain to vanish, and dulness reigns darkly triumphant over the ruins of culture.”

—Lovecraft

“The will and emotion of man crave conditions that do not and never will exist, so that the wise man is he who kills will and emotion to a degree enabling him to despise life and sneer at its puerile illusions and insubstantial goals.

The wise man is a laughing cynic; he takes nothing seriously, ridicules earnestness and zeal, and wants nothing because he knows that the cosmos holds nothing worth wanting. And yet, being wise, he is not a tenth as happy as the dog or peasant that knows no life or aspiration above the simplest animal plane.”

—Lovecraft

“The truth is that there exist two distinct forms of totalitarianism, with very different effects, but each as redoubtable as the other. The first, in  the East, imprisons, persecutes, tortures the body; it however leaves room for hope. The other one in the West leads to the creation of happy robots. It air-conditions hell and kills the soul.”  –Alain de Benoist

“None of us finds it difficult to love the neighbor who seems inferior to us. But to love someone we know is superior is another thing.”

— Nicolás Gómez Dávila

“Power more surely corrupts the man who covets it than the man who exercises it.”

–Nicolás Gómez Dávila

“I believe in the salvation of humanity, in the future of cyanide.”

–Cioran

“Once I ventured the guess that men worked in response to a vague inner urge for self-expression. An hypothesis with rather more plausibility in it now suggests itself. It is that men work simply in order to escape the depressing agony of contemplating life – that their work, like their play, is a mumbo-jumbo that serves them by permitting them to escape from reality.

Man cannot sit still, contemplating his destiny in this world, without going frantic. So he invents ways to take his mind off the horror. He works. He plays. He accumulates the preposterous nothing called property. He strives for the coy eye-wink called fame. He founds a family and spreads his curse over others. All the while the thing that moves him is simply the yearning to lose himself, to forget himself, to escape the tragic-comedy that is himself. Life, fundamentally, is not worth living.”

—H.L. Mencken

“The average civilized man is never fully alive; he is burdened with masses of atrophied tissue and useless matter. Life flickers feebly in him; his senses are dull and torpid. In developing his intellect, he has sacrificed far more than he realizes.”

-Robert E Howard.

“And who was ever bold enough to do nothing because every action is senseless in infinity? The sciences prove our nothingness. But who has grasped their ultimate teaching? Who has become a hero of total sloth? No one folds his arms: we are busier than the ants and the bees.

Yet if an ant, if a bee—by the miracle of an idea or by some temptation of singularity— were to isolate herself in the anthill or the hive, if she contemplated from outside the spectacle of her labors, would she still persist in her pains?

Only the rational animal has been able to learn nothing from his philosophy: he locates himself apart—and perseveres nonetheless in the same errors of effective appearance and void reality.”

—Cioran

“Salvation ends everything; and ends us. Who, once saved, dares still call himself alive? We really live only by the refusal to be delivered from suffering and by a kind of religious temptation of irreligiosity.

The poet would betray himself if he aspired to be saved: salvation is the death of song, the negation of art and of the mind.”

– Emil Cioran

“I turned away from philosophy when it became impossible to discover in Kant any human weakness, any authentic accent of melancholy; in Kant and in all the philosophers. Compared to music, mysticism, and poetry, philosophical activity proceeds from a diminished impulse and a suspect depth, prestigious only for the timid and the tepid.

Moreover, philosophy—impersonal anxiety, refuge among anemic ideas—is the recourse of all who would elude the corrupting exuberance of life. Almost all the philosophers came to a good end: that is the supreme argument against philosophy.”

–Emil Cioran

“My soul is chaos, how can it be at all? There is everything in me: search and you will find out. I am a fossil dating from the beginning of the world: not all of its elements have completely crystallized, and initial chaos still shows through. I am absolute contradiction, climax of antinomies, the last limit of tension; in me anything is possible, for I am he who at the supreme moment, in front of absolute nothingness, will laugh.”
— Emil Cioran

“The rage you feel. It’s a gift. Use it. But don’t let anyone see it.”.
—Nucky Thompson

“My manner of thinking, so you say, cannot be approved. Do you suppose I care? A poor fool indeed is he who adopts a manner of thinking for others!”
— Marquis de Sade

“I have no faith, luckily. If I had, I should live in constant fear of losing it. Hence, far from helping me, it would do nothing but injure me.”
–Cioran

“Man is and remains an animal. Here a beast of prey, there a housepet, but always an animal.” — Joseph Goebbels

“History is nothing but a procession of false Absolutes, a series of temples raised to pretexts, a degradation of the mind before the Improbable. Even when he turns from religion, man remains subject to it; depleting himself to create fake gods, he feverishly adopts them: his need for fiction, for mythology triumphs over evidence and absurdity alike.”
― Emil Cioran

“Since worship of fleshly things produces pleasure, there would then be a temple of glorious indulgence…” –LaVey

“Suppose we force ourselves to see to the bottom of words? We see nothing—each of them, detached from the expansive and fertile soul, being null and void. The power of the intelligence functions by projecting a certain luster upon them, by polishing them and making them glitter; this power, erected into a system, is called culture—pyrotechnics against a night sky of nothingness.”
— Cioran

“Skepticism relieved two terrible diseases that afflicted mankind: anxiety and dogmatism.”
― Sextus Empiricus

“Must not structure have a genesis, and must not the origin, the point of genesis, be already structured, in order to be the genesis of something?” –Derrida

“When the solitude is intensified to the point of constituting not so much our datum as our sole faith, we cease to be integral with the whole: heretics of existence, we are banished from the community of the living, whose sole virtue is to wait, gasping, for something which is not death. But we, emancipated from the fascination of such waiting, rejected from the ecumenicity of illusion–we are the most heretical sect of all for our soul itself is born in heresy.”
-Cioran

“Is it not safer to cower in the caves of lies than to stand upon the cliffs of truth, surveying the world? Yet when one stands in the sunlight, and feels the winds of reality, how dank and shameful seem the dark shelters of falsehood, and how foolish it seems then to have once feared daylight and fresh air.”
— John Norman

“Yet, with respect to the gods, and what I declare about all things, no man has seen what is clear nor ever will any man know it.

Nay, for e’en should he chance to affirm what is really existent, he himself knoweth it not; for all is swayed by opining.”
–Xenophanes

“Metaphysics—the white mythology which reassembles and reflects the culture of the West: the white man takes his own mythology, Indo-European mythology, his own logos, that is, the mythos of his idiom, for the universal form of that he must still wish to call Reason.”
–Derrida

“It is art’s task to make manifest the contradictions of Being.”
— Sergei Eisenstein

“The sadist is in need of institutions, the masochist of contractual relations.”
–Deleuze

“From the idea that the law should not be based on the principle of the Good but on its form alone, the sadist fashions a new method of ascending from the law to a superior principle; this principle, however, is the informal element of a primary nature which aims at the subversion of all laws.

In the other modern discovery that the law increases the guilt of the person who submits to it, the masochist in his turn finds a new way of descending from the law to its consequences: he stands guilt on its head by making punishment into a condition that makes possible the forbidden pleasure. In so doing he overthrows the law as radically as the sadist, though in a different way.”
–Deleuze

“The spiritualization of sensuality is called love: it represents a great triumph over Christianity.”
–Nietzsche

“The wolf is the truth of love, its cruelty, its fangs, its claws, our aptitude for ferocity. Love is when you suddenly wake up as a cannibal, and not just any old cannibal, or else wake up destined for devourment.” –Cixous

The aim is not to rediscover the eternal or the universal, but to find the conditions under which something new is produced (creativeness).
-Deleuze

“[Optimism] is held with greatest tenacity by those most accustomed to the mischance of falling into adversity, and is most acceptably expounded with the grin that apes a smile. Being a blind faith, it is inaccessible to the light of disproof – an intellectual disorder, yielding to no treatment but death. It is hereditary, but fortunately not contagious.”
— Ambrose Bierce

“Cynical people have a disorder of the optic nerve that forces
them to see things as they really are, and not how they ought to be.”

“I believe in the salvation of humanity, in the future of cyanide.”
–Cioran

“I have known many gods. He who denies them is as blind as he who trusts them too deeply. I seek not beyond death. It may be the blackness averred by the Nemedian skeptics, or Crom’s realm of ice and cloud, or the snowy plains and vaulted halls of the Nordheimer’s Valhalla. I know not, nor do I care. Let me live deep while I live; let me know the rich juices of red meat and stinging wine on my palate, the hot embrace of white arms, the mad exultation of battle when the blue blades flame and crimson, and I am content. Let teachers and philosophers brood over questions of reality and illusion. I know this: if life is illusion, then I am no less an illusion, and being thus, the illusion is real to me. I live, I burn with life, I love, I slay, and am content.”
― Robert E. Howard, Conan

“Hope is the virtue of the slave.”
–Cioran

“If men and women would try to turn their attention away from the infinitesimally small differences which distinguish them, as handsome people have to turn their attention away from their good looks, we should soon have heard the last of Man and Woman spelt with capitals, and the day of the individual would be at hand. And the measure of the individual would be not sex, but individual power.”

–Dora Marsden, The Freewoman

“In the time of spirits thoughts grew till they overtopped my head, whose offspring they yet were; they hovered about me and convulsed me like fever-phantasies — an awful power. The thoughts had become corporeal on their own account, were ghosts, e. g. God, Emperor, Pope, Fatherland, etc. If I destroy their corporeity, then I take them back into mine, and say: “I alone am corporeal.” And now I take the world as what it is to me, as mine, as my property; I refer all to myself.”

—Stirner, Max, The Ego and Its Own

“Let’s take today’s capitalism. We have, on the one hand, the demands of the circulation of the capital which push us towards profit making, expansion, exploitation and destruction of nature and, on the other hand, ecological demands: let’s think about our posterity and about our own survival, let’s take care of nature and so on.

In this opposition between ruthless pursuit of capitalist expansion and ecological awareness duty, a strange perverted duty of course; duty is on the side of capitalism, as many prestigious analysts know that.

Capitalism has a strange religious structure. It is propelled by this absolute demand: capital has to circulate to reproduce itself to expand, to multiply itself and for this goal anything can be sacrifices, up to our lives, up to nature and so on.

Here we have a strange unconditional injunction. A true capitalist is a miser who is ready to sacrifice everything for this perverted duty.”

–Zizek

“The Demiurge ordered Adam to name this new creation, but before Adam could utter a name the female spoke and named herself Lil, the Wind-Spirit, for through the breath she had became awakened to herself and escaped the blinded Demiurge, while still confined to the turbid garment of matter.

The act of self-naming and self-defining separated her from the power of the one who would name all other creatures and his creator and she remained defiant and proud in Spirit and strong in Will. This puzzled Adam and enraged the Demiurge.”

“One must not perform the mystery of the ineffable and invisible power through visible and corruptible things of creation, nor that of the unthinkable and immaterial beings through sensible and corporeal things. Perfect salvation is the cognition itself of the ineffable greatness: for since through “Ignorance” came about “Defect” and “Passion,” the whole system springing from the Ignorance is dissolved by knowledge.

Therefore knowledge is salvation of the inner man; and it is not corporeal, for the body is corruptible; nor is it psychical, for even the soul is a product of the defect and is as a lodging to the spirit; spiritual therefore must also be [the form of] salvation. Through knowledge, then, is saved the inner, spiritual man; so that to us suffices the knowledge of universal being: this is the true salvation.”

—Gnostic Valentinus

“Political institutions and ideologies are the warty outgrowth of the religious thinking of the man; in a way responsible for the tragedy of mankind. We are slaves to our ideas and beliefs, and we torture ourselves in the hope of achieving something.

All our experience, spiritual or otherwise, is the basic cause of our suffering…the body is not interested in anything ‘you’ are interested in; that is, the battle that is going on all the time. There seems to be no way out.”

–U.G. Krishnamurti

Allah said: “What prevented you (O Iblis) that you did not prostrate, when I commanded you?”

Iblis said: “I am better than him (Adam), You created me from fire, and him You created from clay.”

“My soul is chaos, how can it be at all? There is everything in me: search and you will find out. I am a fossil dating from the beginning of the world: not all of its elements have completely crystallized, and initial chaos still shows through. I am absolute contradiction, climax of antinomies, the last limit of tension; in me anything is possible, for I am he who at the supreme moment, in front of absolute nothingness, will laugh.”
— Emil Cioran

“The rage you feel. It’s a gift. Use it. But don’t let anyone see it.”.
—Nucky Thompson

“My manner of thinking, so you say, cannot be approved. Do you suppose I care? A poor fool indeed is he who adopts a manner of thinking for others!”
— Marquis de Sade

“I have no faith, luckily. If I had, I should live in constant fear of losing it. Hence, far from helping me, it would do nothing but injure me.”
–Cioran

“Man is and remains an animal. Here a beast of prey, there a housepet, but always an animal.” — Joseph Goebbels

“History is nothing but a procession of false Absolutes, a series of temples raised to pretexts, a degradation of the mind before the Improbable. Even when he turns from religion, man remains subject to it; depleting himself to create fake gods, he feverishly adopts them: his need for fiction, for mythology triumphs over evidence and absurdity alike.”
― Emil Cioran

“Since worship of fleshly things produces pleasure, there would then be a temple of glorious indulgence…” –LaVey

“Suppose we force ourselves to see to the bottom of words? We see nothing—each of them, detached from the expansive and fertile soul, being null and void. The power of the intelligence functions by projecting a certain luster upon them, by polishing them and making them glitter; this power, erected into a system, is called culture—pyrotechnics against a night sky of nothingness.”
— Cioran

“Skepticism relieved two terrible diseases that afflicted mankind: anxiety and dogmatism.”
― Sextus Empiricus

“Must not structure have a genesis, and must not the origin, the point of genesis, be already structured, in order to be the genesis of something?” –Derrida

“When the solitude is intensified to the point of constituting not so much our datum as our sole faith, we cease to be integral with the whole: heretics of existence, we are banished from the community of the living, whose sole virtue is to wait, gasping, for something which is not death. But we, emancipated from the fascination of such waiting, rejected from the ecumenicity of illusion–we are the most heretical sect of all for our soul itself is born in heresy.”
-Cioran

“Is it not safer to cower in the caves of lies than to stand upon the cliffs of truth, surveying the world? Yet when one stands in the sunlight, and feels the winds of reality, how dank and shameful seem the dark shelters of falsehood, and how foolish it seems then to have once feared daylight and fresh air.”
— John Norman

“Yet, with respect to the gods, and what I declare about all things, no man has seen what is clear nor ever will any man know it.

Nay, for e’en should he chance to affirm what is really existent, he himself knoweth it not; for all is swayed by opining.”
–Xenophanes

“Metaphysics—the white mythology which reassembles and reflects the culture of the West: the white man takes his own mythology, Indo-European mythology, his own logos, that is, the mythos of his idiom, for the universal form of that he must still wish to call Reason.”
–Derrida

“It is art’s task to make manifest the contradictions of Being.”
— Sergei Eisenstein

“The sadist is in need of institutions, the masochist of contractual relations.”
–Deleuze

“From the idea that the law should not be based on the principle of the Good but on its form alone, the sadist fashions a new method of ascending from the law to a superior principle; this principle, however, is the informal element of a primary nature which aims at the subversion of all laws.

In the other modern discovery that the law increases the guilt of the person who submits to it, the masochist in his turn finds a new way of descending from the law to its consequences: he stands guilt on its head by making punishment into a condition that makes possible the forbidden pleasure. In so doing he overthrows the law as radically as the sadist, though in a different way.”
–Deleuze

“The spiritualization of sensuality is called love: it represents a great triumph over Christianity.”
–Nietzsche

“The wolf is the truth of love, its cruelty, its fangs, its claws, our aptitude for ferocity. Love is when you suddenly wake up as a cannibal, and not just any old cannibal, or else wake up destined for devourment.” –Cixous

The aim is not to rediscover the eternal or the universal, but to find the conditions under which something new is produced (creativeness).
-Deleuze

“[Optimism] is held with greatest tenacity by those most accustomed to the mischance of falling into adversity, and is most acceptably expounded with the grin that apes a smile. Being a blind faith, it is inaccessible to the light of disproof – an intellectual disorder, yielding to no treatment but death. It is hereditary, but fortunately not contagious.”
— Ambrose Bierce

“Cynical people have a disorder of the optic nerve that forces
them to see things as they really are, and not how they ought to be.”

“I believe in the salvation of humanity, in the future of cyanide.”
–Cioran

“I have known many gods. He who denies them is as blind as he who trusts them too deeply. I seek not beyond death. It may be the blackness averred by the Nemedian skeptics, or Crom’s realm of ice and cloud, or the snowy plains and vaulted halls of the Nordheimer’s Valhalla. I know not, nor do I care. Let me live deep while I live; let me know the rich juices of red meat and stinging wine on my palate, the hot embrace of white arms, the mad exultation of battle when the blue blades flame and crimson, and I am content. Let teachers and philosophers brood over questions of reality and illusion. I know this: if life is illusion, then I am no less an illusion, and being thus, the illusion is real to me. I live, I burn with life, I love, I slay, and am content.”
― Robert E. Howard, Conan

“Hope is the virtue of the slave.”
–Cioran

“The knightly-aristocratic value judgements presupposed a powerful physicality, a flourishing, abundent, even overflowing, health – together with that which serves to preserve it: war, adventure, hunting, dancing, war games, and in general, all that involves vigorous free joyful activity.”
— Friedrich Nietzsche

“Man is insatiable for power; he is infantile in his desires and, always discontented with what he has, loves only what he has not. People complain of the despotism of princes; they ought to complain of the despotism of man.”
— Joseph de Maistre

“And in the kisses, what deep sweetness! There are women’s mouths that seem to ignite with love the breath that opens them. Whether they are reddened by blood richer than purple, or frozen by the pallor of agony, whether they are illuminated by the goodness of consent or darkened by the shadow of disdain, they always carry within them an enigma that disturbs men of intellect, and attracts them and captivates them.

A constant discord between the expression of the lips and that of the eyes generates the mystery; it seems as if a duplicitous soul reveals itself there with a different beauty, happy and sad, cold and passionate, cruel and merciful, humble and proud, laughing and mocking; and the ambiguity arouses discomfort in the spirit that takes pleasure in dark things.”

― Gabriele D’Annunzio, The Child Of Pleasure

“Man was, and is, too shallow and cowardly to endure the fact of the mortality of everything living. He wraps it up in rose-coloured progress-optimism, he heaps upon it the flowers of literature, he crawls behind the shelter of ideals so as not to see anything. But impermanence, the birth and the passing, is the form of all that is actual — from the stars, whose destiny is for us incalculable, right down to the ephemeral concourses on our planet. The life of the individual — whether this be animal or plant or man — is as perishable as that of peoples of Cultures.

Every creation is foredoomed to decay, every thought, every discovery, every deed to oblivion. Here, there, and everywhere we are sensible of grandly fated courses of history that have vanished. Ruins of the “have-been” works of dead Cultures lie all about us. The hybris of Prometheus, who thrust his hand into the heavens in order to make the divine powers subject to man, carries with it his fall. What, then, becomes of the chatter about “undying achievements”?

-Oswald Spengler

Advertisements