“Whoever becomes a lamb, will find a wolf to eat him.”

–Vilfredo Pareto

No one recovers from being born, a deadly wound if ever there was one. Yet it is with the hope of being cured of it some day that we accept life and endure its ordeals. The years pass, the wound remains. Emil Cioran

“The quantitative degeneration of all things is closely linked to that of money, as is shown by the fact that nowadays the ‘worth’ of an object is ordinarily ‘estimated’ only in terms of its price, considered simply as a ‘figure’, a ‘sum’, or a numerical quantity of money; in fact, with most of our contemporaries, every judgment brought to bear on an object is nearly always based exclusively on what it costs. The word ‘estimate’ has been emphasized because it has in itself a double meaning, qualitative and quantitative; today the first meaning has been lost to sight, or what amounts to the same thing, means have been found to equate it to the second, and thus it comes about that not only is the ‘worth’ of an object ‘estimated’ according to its price, but the ‘worth’ of a man is ‘estimated’ according to his wealth.”

The deepest and most organic death is death in solitude, when even light becomes a principle of death. In such moments you will be severed from life, from love, smiles, friends and even from death. And you will ask yourself if there is anything besides the nothingness of the world and your own nothingness. Emil Cioran

Beware the irrational, however seductive. Shun the ‘transcendent’ and all who invite you to subordinate or annihilate yourself. Distrust compassion; prefer dignity for yourself and others. Don’t be afraid to be thought arrogant or selfish. Picture all experts as they were mammals. Never be a spectator of unfairness or stupidity. Seek out argument and disputation for their own sake; the grave will supply plenty of time for silence. Suspect your own motives, and all excuses. Do not live for others any more than you would expect others to live for you. Christopher Hitchens

In youth we were whole and the terror and pain of the world penetrated us through and through. There was no sharp separation between joy and sorrow: they fused into one, as our walking life fuses with dream and sleep. We rose one being in the morning and at night we went down into an ocean, drowned out completely, clutching the stars and the fever of the day. Henry Miller

I hope that in the future we will continue to hear the soothing sound of church-bells from the steeple of my village and the towers of our cathedrals. But I hope even more that the prayers uttered under their vaults will change. I hope that one will cease to beg for forgiveness and mercy, and instead call for strength, dignity and energy.
Dominique Venner

The world will go out like a Roman candle. Not even a blade of grass will grow again. A lethal dose from which no awakening. Peace and night, with no moan or whisper stirring. A soft, brooding darkness, an inaudible flapping of wings. Henry Miller, Black Spring

“What makes a people? A people has a common heritage and a will to a common destiny. A people exists despite superficial cleavages such as parties, interest groups, and passing trends in ideologies. As Georges Dumézil, Mircea Eliade, and Carl G. Jung have demonstrated, a people shares a “mythe fondateur”-a communal myth that gives birth to original cultural endeavors. The culture of a people, recalls Alain de Benoist, is its identity card and its mental respiration, and “it is the passport for a future that takes the shape of destiny.””

–Tomislav Sunic

“The joy of life discovered by the Greeks is not a profane type of enjoyment: it reveals the bliss of existing, of sharing — even fugitively — in the spontaneity of life and the majesty of the world. Like so many others before and after them, the Greeks learned that the surest way to escape from time is to exploit the wealth, at first sight impossible to suspect, of the lived instant.”

–Mircea Eliade

“The crises of modern man are to a large extent religious ones, insofar as they are an awakening of his awareness to an absence of meaning.”

–Mircea Eliade

“The manifestation of the sacred in a stone or a tree is neither less mysterious nor less noble than its manifestation in a “god”.”

–Mircea Eliade

“The syndrome of kali yuga is marked by the fact that it is the only age in which property alone confers social rank; wealth becomes the only motive of virtues, passion and lust the only bonds between the married, falsehood and deception the first condition of success in life, sexuality the sole means of enjoyment, while external, merely ritualstic religion is confused with spirituality. For several thousand years, be it understood, we have been living in kali yuga.”

–Mircea Eliade

“The way towards wisdom or towards freedom is the way towards your inner being. This is the simplest definition of metaphysics.”

–Mircea Eliade

“The great cosmic illusion is a hierophany…. One is devoured by Time, not because one lives in Time, but because one believes in its reality, and therefore forgets or despises eternity.”

–Mircea Eliade
The aesthetics Venner embraced in his youth held that beauty, in its harmony with the cosmic order, trumps ugliness; that tragedy is the basis of all redeeming art; that the form of a state (republic, monarchy, etc.) matters less than the type of man who dominates its society; and that it is never the law that guarantees the good behavior of a man, but the quality of a man that insures the integrity of the law.
Michael O’Meara on Dominique Venner

Diverse as they are, men exist only in that which distinguishes them from one another — clans, peoples, nations, cultures, civilizations — and not by their animality, which is universal. Sexuality is common to all humanity, as is the necessity to eat. But love, like gastronomy, is distinct to each civilization, that is, it’s the result of a long conscious effort. As Europeans conceive it, love was already evident in the Homeric poems, as exhibited by such distinct characters as Helen, Nausicâa, Hector, Andromache, Ulysses, and Penelope. The sort of love evinced through these characters is completely different from that found in the great Asian civilizations, whose refinement and beauty are a matter of record.

 

—Dominique Venner

“Far from being born from tranquillity, Greek order was the child of tragedy. It was the fruit of sinister forces that had been mastered and sublimated, in accordance with the old adage that the best things can emerge from from the worst.

 For the Greeks, the creators of the highest forms of European civilization, perfection is inseparable from limits, from finitude. They knew that perfection consists in a deepening, rather than expansion. In the beginning of the Theogony, Hesiod shows us that the cosmos became order and beauty because the gods imposed limits on the destructive overflowing of vital forces. With Christianity, this view was completely inverted. Now perfection lay in God, in other words, in the infinite. The transition from one mentality to another took place slowly and imperceptibly. […]
In the tradition of all ancient European peoples, including the Greeks, nature is sacred, it is the realm of the gods, and sets limits to its exploitation by man.

Dominique Venner

“It should be understood that war is the common condition, that strife is justice, and that all things come to pass through the compulsion of strife.”

–Heraclitus

Contrary to materialism, tradition does not explain the higher through the lower, ethics through heredity, politics through interests, love through sexuality. However, heredity has its part in ethics and culture, interest has its part in politics, and sexuality has its part in love. However, tradition orders them in a hierarchy. It constructs personal and collective existence from above to below.
Dominique Venner
“What did the communists want? They wanted to create a new man, a rational and universal man, freed from the fetters of roots, nature and culture. They wanted the disappearance of concrete, differentiated men, the men of old Europe, multiple and tragic.

 And the American west, what did it want? The same thing, the only difference was in the methods employed. The American system sees the globalized market as the principal factor of economic rationality and change.

Dominique Venner

The capitalist oligarchy is indifferent to the fate of national communities. Its goal is to satisfy an insatiable will to power through the economic domination of the world. Mankind and its civilisations are sacrificed for its purely materialistic designs, which parallel those of the Marxists. For the technocrats as well as the communists, man is an economic animal endowed with two functions: produce and consume. What cannot be measured by a slide rule is classed as superfluous. The superfluous must submit to the essential: economic output. Individualist tendencies, which are an inconvenience for the edification and the application of plans, must disappear. In the materialist societies, there is only room for the perfectly docile, homogenous, and standardised masses.

—Dominque Venner

“In its own way, the American Dream is the most aggressively egalitarian concept in history, far more devastating in its effects than any doctrine dreamed of by Marx or Lenin. It utterly liquidates any consideration of community ties, religious obligations, or traditional ideals in favor an unrestrained individualism grounded in absolute equality. This ideological egalitarianism, paradoxically, enables increasing economic inequality and entrenchment of the financial system. We are told we are all created equal – which leads to the unrestrained reign of wealth, unhindered by community responsibility, ethnic solidarity, or even noblesse oblige.

The doctrine of equality of race, gender, culture, and human quality enables the permanent entrenchment of a power structure elite that denies its own elitism. We have a ruling class that is secure precisely because it denies any hierarchical basis to its lordship. Its power is unchallenged because it denies it has power. It rules because it flatters its serfs that they rule themselves – in fact, telling them that no one rules them at all.”

Gregory Hood

 Egalitarianism is also a source of apathy, and not just because in universal states people no longer trust each other, but also because egalitarianism is essentially nihilistic, because it destroys value. Egalitarianism seeks to create a system the embraces everyone, and in the process redefines categories and archetypes in a way that makes them meaningful to no one. Because you see, something has value if it is different or unique, or because it makes you different and or unique. Either because it has or because it signifies certain qualities, or because it has or signifies superior quality.

Alex Kurtagic
“Liberalism is the exoteric religion of the financial oligarchs, the high priests of Mammon who rule the West. Appealing to the vanity and self-regard of the profane, they manufacture consent by way of elections, propaganda and all manner of distractive spectacle. Manipulation of the popular consciousness, a black art honed to new levels of refinement over the last century, is now accomplished through electronic memes and quite literal programming in television, music and film. An inverted hierarchy will promote inverted values. Who among us today honors saints and warriors past as heroes worthy of our emulation? Under the usury bankster regime, we instead offer adoration to the savage and the harlot.”
Mark Hackard
“What they had done in their youth, and what for millenniums had been man’s vocation, joy and pleasure — to ride a horse, to plow in the morning the steaming field, to walk behind the oxen, to mow the yellow grain in the blazing summer heat while streams of sweat poured down the tanned body and the women who bound the sheaves could hardly keep in step with the mowers, to rest at noon for a meal in the shade of green trees — all this, praised by the poets since times immemorial, was now past and gone.

Joy in labor had disappeared.”

  Ernst Jünger
“Modern civilized man cannot endure cruelty, pain and suffering and is more merciful than men of the past, but this is not because he is morally and spiritually higher than they. He fears pain and suffering more than they did; he is more effeminate, less firm, patient and courageous than they; in other words he is spiritually less strong.”
–Nicolas Berdyaev

If you look at mass and popular culture, the heroic is still alive. It’s alive in junk films, in comic books, in forms that our culture’s intellectuals disprivilege. Why is the heroic treated at that level? Because liberalism can’t deal with the heroic. It doesn’t have a space for it in its ideology, so it decants it.

Much of popular culture involves the celebration of men, iconographically in films and so on, who are authoritarian, who are hierarchical, who are elitist. How many cinema posters have you seen with a man alone with a gun staring into the distance? It’s the primordial American myth! These are men who think ‘fascistically’; and they fight against fascism! They fight against authoritarian ideas of what the west once was and can become again.

This is always the trick. They’ll use the ideology of the marine core to fight for a liberal, a humanist, and a democratic purpose. That’s the trick! In every film, in every television program, in every comic, in every novel, in everything that the masses consume that isn’t purely about sex or sport, the heroic is there, and they always fight for liberal causes! And their enemies are always grinning japanese generals, or nazis! Used again and again and again, as a stereotype of a stereotype of a stereotype, to impose the idea that that which is core, primal, European, is morally wrong!

Jonathan Bowden

“The first act of resistance always consists in freeing oneself from the dread and fascination of words. Words invoke images, which may be healthy or toxic, discouraging or rousing. Through words and their power to seduce, deceive or intimidate, the dominant system imprisons whomever it wants to subdue, long before resorting to more menacing weapons. Choosing the name by which one designates one’s adversaries, naming them, is already to exercise power over them, to make them play according to one’s own rules without them knowing it, preparing their annihilation, or conversely, freeing oneself from their grasp. That is what the emperor Julian, Machiavelli, Voltaire, Nietzsche or Solzhentisyn did, as a way of liberating themselves.

Words are weapons. To arm oneself with one’s own words, and first and foremost, to name oneself, is to affirm one’s existence, one’s autonomy, one’s freedom. Thus, we designate ourselves as the defiant [insoumis].

The defiant stand in an intimate relationship to legitimacy. They define themselves in opposition to what they perceive as illegitimate. Confronted with usurpation or sacrilege, they are a law unto themselves, but only out of loyalty to a defiled legitimacy. Defiance is above all a thing of the spirit, before there is recourse to arms.”

Dominique Venner

It is going to be the most revolutionary moment in our history, when the dark corners of our being are awakened, the beast, the beast that has been rattling its chains for decades. The liberals thought that they had killed the beast, the liberals thought that they had managed to castrate the Europeans, to render them harmless so that you can just push them away when the moment comes. When we finally come to terms with our animal side, the dark side, the good side, the energy, the passion, the rage… it is going to be a most healing moment.
Professor Kai Murros

The true meaning of aristocracy: “I am preaching to the aristocrat, I mean the person who stands at the pinnacle of mankind and yet has the deepest understanding for the distress and want for those below.He well understands the Kaffir who only weaves ornaments into his fabric according to a particular rhythm that only comes into view when it is unravelled, the Persian who weaves his carpet, the Slovak peasant woman who embroiders her lace, the old lady who crochets wonderful things with glass beads and silk.

The aristocrat lets them be; he knows that the hours in which they work are their holy hours. The revolutionary would go to them and say: ‘It’s all nonsense.’ Just as he would pull down the little old woman from the wayside crucifix and tell her: ‘There is no God.’ The atheist among the aristocrats, on the other hand, raises his hat when he passes a church.”

— Adolf Loos, “Ornament and Crime”

“As you become proficient in the use of language, your style will emerge, because you yourself will emerge.”

—   Strunk & White, The Elements of Style

“Man is a beast of prey. I shall say it again and again. All the would-be moralists and social-ethics people who claim or hope to be “beyond all that” are only beasts of prey with their teeth broken, who hate others on account of the attacks which they themselves are wise enough to avoid. Only look at them. They are too weak to read a book on war, but they herd together in the street to see an accident, letting the blood and the screams play on their nerves. And if even that is too much for them, they enjoy it on the film and in the illustrated papers. If I call man a beast of prey, which do I insult: man or beast? For remember, the larger beasts of prey are noble creatures, perfect of their kind, and without the hypocrisy of human moral due to weakness.

They shout: “No more war” — but they desire class war. They are indignant when a murderer is executed for a crime of passion, but they feel a secret pleasure in hearing of the murder of a political opponent. What objection have they ever raised to the Bolshevist slaughters? There is no getting away from it: conflict is the original fact of life, it is life itself, and not the most pitiful pacifist is able entirely to uproot the pleasure it gives his inmost soul.”

–Oswald Spengler

 

“Modern capitalism is just as subversive as Marxism. The materialistic view of life on which both systems are based is identical. As long as we only talk about economic classes, profit, salaries, and production, and as long as we believe that real human progress is determined by a particular system of distribution of wealth and goods, then we are not even close to what is essential.”
Julius Evola,
“A sign which almost always accompanies the decadence of an aristocracy is the invasion of humanitarian sentiments and delicate “sob-stuff” which renders it incapable of defending its position. We must not confuse violence and force. Violence usually accompanies weakness. We can observe individuals and classes, who, having lost the force to maintain themselves in power, become more and more odious by resorting to indiscriminate violence. A strong man strikes only when it is absolutely necessary–and then nothing stops him. Trajan was strong but not violent; Caligula was violent but not strong.”
Vilfredo Pareto

My last statement above reiterates the idea (mentioned early on in this essay) that there are conflicts of interest between human groups. I take this to be a truism, but in fact it is a controversial claim today. The ideal of multiculturalism, after all, is that of a society in which different groups happily coexist and have no fundamental conflicts of interest. But this ideal rests upon a breathtakingly shallow view of what “culture” consists in.
The liberal “celebration of diversity” is in fact a celebration of culture only in its external and superficial forms. In other words, to Western liberals “multiculturalism” winds up amounting simply to such things as the co-existence of different costumes, music, styles of dance, languages, and food. But the real guts of the different cultures consist in such things as how they view nature, how they view the divine, how they view men and women, and how they view the relative importance of their own group in the scheme of things. And it is by no means clear that members of cultures with radically different views on these matters can peacefully co-exist.

Unless, of course all cultural differences are eliminated save the purely external, via the transformation of all peoples into homogenized, interchangeable consumers bereft of any deeply-felt convictions. This is, in fact, the hidden global capitalist agenda of multiculturalism, now being cheerfully advanced by useful idiots on the anti-capitalist Left.

Collin Cleary

“In the first place, scientific knowledge does not represent the totality of knowledge; it has always existed in addition to, and in competition and conflict with, another kind of knowledge, which I will call narrative in the interests of simplicity (its characteristics will be described later). I do not mean to say that narrative knowledge can prevail over science, but its model is related to ideas of internal equilibrium and conviviality next to which contemporary scientific knowledge cuts a poor figure, especially if it is to undergo an exteriorisation with respect to the “knower” and an alienation from its user even greater than has previously been the case.”

— Jean-Francois Lyotard

The good, the admirable reader identifies himself not with the boy or the girl in the book, but with the mind that conceived and composed that book. The admirable reader does not seek information about Russia in a Russian novel, for he knows that the Russia of Tolstoy or Chekhov is not the average Russia of history but a specific world imagined and created by individual genius. The admirable reader is not concerned with general ideas; he is interested in the particular vision. He likes the novel not because it helps him to get along with the group (to use a diabolical progressive-school cliche); he likes the novel because he imbibes and understands every detail of the text, enjoys what the author meant to be enjoyed, beams inwardly and all over, is thrilled by the magic imageries of the master-forger, the fancy-forger, the conjuror, the artist. Indeed of all the characters that a great artist creates, his readers are the best.

Vladimir Nabokov

“Waste is the highest virtue one can achieve in advanced capitalist society.”

— Haruki Murakami

“And I had at one point this rather depressing image of some alien creature seeing the death of this planet and coming down in their spaceships and sniffing around and finding all our skeletons sitting around our TV sets and trying to work out why it was that our end came before its time, and they come to the conclusion that we amused ourselves to death.”

— Roger Waters

“When we accept that life is will to power, our consciousness will align itself with our subconscious, thereby providing a tonic harmony.”
Peter Sjöstedt-H

“Accepting that the world is without meaning, we are liberated from confinement in the meaning we have made. Knowing there is nothing of substance in our world may seem to rob that world of value. But this nothingness may be our most precious possession, since it opens to us the inexhaustible world that exists beyond ourselves.”

–John Gray

“The irony of secular cultures is that they are ruled by myths. It is a commonplace that science has displaced religion. What is less often noted is that science has become a vehicle for needs that are indisputably religious. Like religion in the past, though less effectively, science offers meaning and hope. In politics, improvement is fragmentary and reversible. In science, the growth of knowledge is cumulative and now seemingly unstoppable. Science gives a sensation of progress that politics cannot deliver. It is an illusion, but that in no way diminishes its power. We may live in a post-Christian culture, but the idea of providence has not disappeared. People still need to believe that a benign pattern can be glimpsed in the chaos of human events.”

–John Gray, Heresies

This pain that you hold is yours.

There is not a single pain quite like it.

Nobody else on God’s green earth can feel this pain, or have the indescribable feeling of pride you will have when you overcome it. This pain is not your curse; this pain is YOUR PRIVILEGE

-Arnold Scharznegger

“To be a pagan” is a purely philosophical matter. It means identification with a value system which locates both agonality and harmony within a manifold world seen as the only one, instead of identification with a value system which devalues the world in favor of another one posited as something “beyond.” That means that I prefer Heraclitus and Parmenides to St. Paul, or the universe of the Vedas to the one of scholasticism. These worldviews, which have confronted each other for millennia, are neither from yesteryear nor tomorrow but are eternal. I should add that I have no sympathy for sects or folkloristic reconstructions.”

Alain de Benoist

[T]he postmodern individual is the most conditioned and the most chained human type that ever existed in our recorded history. Not only a complete slave to any whim or impulse that presents itself as ‘the next best thing’, but also the perfect puppet to even the most gross and evident manipulation. Since he can mold himself into anything he ‘wants’, the postmodernist can, thus, also be molded, from the outside, into anything that the technocratic ‘elites’ of our days desire. He can be subjected to all manners of social engineering, without even the least possibility of resistance, for he can never discern between his desire and the desire of another — in the absence of any absolute, stable point of reference, external circumstances become the only considerations, and circumstances can always be easily manipulated.

However, what is most striking to this postmodern ‘philosophy’ is its resemblance of many traditional spiritual disciplines. Let’s take deconstructionism: in virtually any authentic religion or spiritual path, the goal is to purify the human person of passions and artificial desires in order to truly be one’s self, understood as the inner vocation and essence, which is the direct manifestation of the will of God. In postmodernism we see a caricature of this ideal. Here the individual is called upon to ‘release’ himself from the bondage of external ‘conventions’ and ‘constructs’ and be whoever he wants to be. However, without God, without the vertical dimension it all becomes a contradiction. Since no essence is recognized, the only solution that postmodernism sees is to become ‘free’ by a horizontal and meaningless change of artificial identities.

In reality, as said above, the postmodernist doesn’t actually free himself from external ‘constructs’, but merely trades one for another ad nauseam.

— Mihai, On Postmodernism

“I ignore the pain because the pain will never stop.

Use the pain as fuel, use the hate, use all the frustration to overcome your struggles.

Those unwilling to struggle to live don’t deserve to live.

Life is an eternal struggle. It is when you accept this and build yourself from it instead of running from it that you find your real strength.”

While the entire Western world is facing similar and inter-related challenges nowadays—from mass non-European immigration to financial bankruptcy, from cultural debasement to social atomization—the identity of “the West” that is at stake is not clearly understood. Often, what is meant by “the West” is its neoconservative conception: liberal democracy, human rights, and cultural and religious plur…alism. Since this “West” doesn’t recognize race, or culture in the full sense of the word, it knows no border. It is all too often conflated with the Occident, which has a history of its own and is embodied by a particular people—the European people.

— Richard Spencer
“What makes a people? A people has a common heritage and a will to a common destiny. A people exists despite superficial cleavages such as parties, interest groups, and passing trends in ideologies. As Georges Dumézil, Mircea Eliade, and Carl G. Jung have demonstrated, a people shares a “mythe fondateur”— a communal myth that gives birth to original cultural endeavors. The culture of a people, recalls Alain de Benoist, is its identity card and its mental respiration, and “it is the passport for a future that takes the shape of destiny.”
Tomislav Sunic

“Whoever criticizes capitalism, while approving immigration, whose working class is its first victim, had better shut up. Whoever criticizes immigration, while remaining silent about capitalism, should do the same.” — Alain de Benoist

“Hope is my enemy. She is a succubus who descends upon sleeping humankind, whispering that there is a future. A bright futuer, as a matter of fact; as long as we persevere in extending our essences through the lives of our children, and through their children.

She is a liar, a snakeoil salesman bartering chimera for generative fluid, which she sucks out of us before casting our withered husks onto the fire. And so we fall, row upon row like seasons of corn, but not until we relinquish our seed into her exploitive hands. For in the end, we all die, and only Hope lives on. And we rot, sometimes mourned for a season, but presently forgotten. Ultimately, like it or not, we are the future’s dirt. This is the state of affairs we choose to subject our children to.”

-Jim Crawford

“A charmed life is so rare that for every one such life there are millions of wretched lives. Some know that their baby will be among the unfortunate. Nobody knows, however, that their baby will be one of the allegedly lucky few. Great suffering could await any person that is brought into existence. Even the most privileged people could give birth to a child that will suffer unbearably, be raped, assaulted, or be murdered brutally. The optimist surely bears the burden of justifying this procreational Russian roulette.

Given that there are no real advantages over never existing for those who are brought into existence, it is hard to see how the significant risk of serious harm could be justified. If we count not only the unusually severe harms that anybody could endure, but also the quite routine ones of ordinary human life, then we find that matters are still worse for cheery procreators. It shows that they play Russian roulette with a fully loaded gun—aimed, of course, not at their own heads, but at those of their future offspring.”

― David Benatar

“Looking out Schopenhauer’s window
Passions coagulate to form a man;
ancient things, born of the first wave.
Rationality the unexpected offspring;
allowed to build its Tinkertoy edifice –
that idiot savant.
“I am my own master” it boasts,

but almost never sees it coming —
the back of the hand;
Doesn’t think to duck;
except, perhaps, in retrospect,

It was never different, you know?
Never a golden age.
Never better times.
Never enough wisdom.
Just pretense, born of shame —
survivalist posturing,
like a dog that bows its head to protect its own throat…
We are ravenous.

Deceit,
nested within lust,
nested within blind impulse–
the fundamental beast of existence.

Blind.
Unaware.
Unstoppable.

WE are apologists.
We dress it up in silken robes,
and parade it before the gathered crowds.
We offer our skins in service to its charade,
placing blinders over our eyes,
lest they become portals into our own
malignancy.
To to otherwise would be to invite madness.

Having once and for all described
the leprous hand of the puppeteer,
the natural question might be:
Why?
But, I ask you…
who will hear the answers?”

Jim Crawford

“Nonexistence, as far as personhood is concerned, may not have many definable attributes, but it has one. It is the default state of life, and of consciousness. Nonexistence stretches out eternally behind us, as well as in front of us. This existence is, indeed, a trivial tale pressed between the bookends of eternal nothingness. But within that eternal nothingness lies the kingdom of the SNB (State of Negative Bliss). 


The SNB was our original home, until we were yanked out by life’s self-replicating compulsion into this world of promise and loss. All of us will return to the SNB in due time, bearing no memories of our sojourn here.”

-Jim Crawford

“We’re born, we suffer and die in the grasp of blind, cruel chance. The reason we invent “Holy Purpose” is precisely because are in need of straws to clutch. All of us are drowning in a sea of cosmic indifference. Out attempts of transcendence are nothing more than pathetic Hail Mary passes, launched as the clock times out, in the hope of discovering a loophole where none exists.

And because we’re desperate, we’ll either hang onto laughably outmoded anthropomorphic expressions engineered by our despair, or we’ll latch onto new gurus who promise us existential escape pods born of this or that sham singularity. Krishna, Jesus or Buck Rogers. All their promises are so much chimera”

Jim Crawford

“If you worship your enemy, you are defeated. If you adopt your enemy’s religion, you are enslaved. If you breed with your enemy, you are destroyed.”
Polydoros of Sparta (741 to c. 665 BC)

“Hope is my enemy. She is a succubus who descends upon sleeping humankind, whispering that there is a future. A bright futuer, as a matter of fact; as long as we persevere in extending our essences through the lives of our children, and through their children.

She is a liar, a snakeoil salesman bartering chimera for generative fluid, which she sucks out of us before casting our withered husks onto the fire. And so we fall, row upon row like seasons of corn, but not until we relinquish our seed into her exploitive hands. For in the end, we all die, and only Hope lives on. And we rot, sometimes mourned for a season, but presently forgotten. Ultimately, like it or not, we are the future’s dirt. This is the state of affairs we choose to subject our children to.”

-Jim Crawford

“When contemporary humanists invoke the idea of progress they are mixing together two different myths: a Socratic myth of reason and a Christian myth of salvation. If the resulting body of ideas is incoherent, that is the source of its appeal. Humanists believe that humanity improves along with the growth of knowledge, but the belief that the increase of knowledge goes with advances in civilization is an act of faith.

They see the realization of human potential as the goal of history, when rational inquiry shows history to have no goal. They exalt nature, while insisting that humankind – an accident of nature – can overcome the natural limits that shape the lives of other animals. Plainly absurd, this nonsense gives meaning to the lives of people who believe they have left all myths behind.”

— John Gray, The Silence of Animals

“People are even more reluctant to admit that man explains nothing, than they were to admit that God explains nothing.”

-Ernest Gellner

“None of us finds it difficult to love the neighbor who seems inferior to us. But to love someone we know is superior is another thing.”

–Nicolás Gómez Dávila

“Whenever I reflect, my reflecting upon what I suffer only rouses me to blame him that begot me. And I gave peace to my children, for they are in the bliss of nonexistence which surpasses all the pleasures of this world. Had they come to life, they would have endured a misery casting them to destruction in trackless wildernesses.”

—Reynold Alleyne Nicholson

“The Christian hero was the martyr, for as in the Jewish tradition, the highest achievement was to give one’s life for God or for one’s fellow beings. The martyr is the exact opposite of the pagan hero personified in the Greek and Germanic heroes. The heroes’ aim was to conquer, to be victorious, to destroy, to rob; their fulfillment of life was pride, power, fame, and superior skill in killing (St. Augustine compared Roman history with that of a band of robbers).

For the pagan hero a man’s worth lay in his prowess in attaining and holding onto power, and he gladly died on the battlefield in the moment of victory. Homer’s Iliad is the poetically magnificent description of glorified conquerors and robbers. The martyr’s characteristics are being, giving, sharing; the hero’s, having, exploiting, forcing.”

–Alain de Benoist

“It is useless for the sheep to pass resolutions in favor of vegetarianism while the wolf remains of a different opinion.”

–Dean William Inge

“A charmed life is so rare that for every one such life there are millions of wretched lives. Some know that their baby will be among the unfortunate. Nobody knows, however, that their baby will be one of the allegedly lucky few. Great suffering could await any person that is brought into existence. Even the most privileged people could give birth to a child that will suffer unbearably, be raped, assaulted, or be murdered brutally. The optimist surely bears the burden of justifying this procreational Russian roulette.

Given that there are no real advantages over never existing for those who are brought into existence, it is hard to see how the significant risk of serious harm could be justified. If we count not only the unusually severe harms that anybody could endure, but also the quite routine ones of ordinary human life, then we find that matters are still worse for cheery procreators. It shows that they play Russian roulette with a fully loaded gun—aimed, of course, not at their own heads, but at those of their future offspring.”

― David Benatar

“It is useless for the sheep to pass resolutions in favor of vegetarianism while the wolf remains of a different opinion.”

“Nature destroys the weak but helps the strong, awakening in the soul emotions which remain dormant under the urban conditions of modern life.”

Ferdinand Ossendowski

“The brave man is ever generous, frank, outspoken, dauntless. His brow is open, his step fearless and firm, his bearing self-poised, leonine. He looks at you without a tremor, sums you up at a glance, and in business affairs his ‘word of honor’ is more binding than a Shylock’s sealed bond. He may not be an erudite philosopher, a profound scholar, nor an eminent elocutionist (nor be troubled over much with the ‘saving’ of his soul) but he is more than all that – he is a man. Hence, everywhere he is first favorite, especially with the feminine gender, whose sexual instincts are as true to Nature as the needle is to the pole.”

–Ragnar Redbeard

“Formerly, no one was allowed to think freely; now it is permitted, but no one is capable of it any more. Now people want to think only what they are supposed to think, and this they consider freedom”

–Oswald Spengler

“Nor is there any valid reason to reject the idea of God or the notion of the sacred just because of the sickly expression Christianity has given to them, any more than it is necessary to break with aristocratic principles on the pretext that they have been caricatured by the bourgeoisie.”
― Alain de BenoistOn Being A Pagan

“There is no need to ”believe” in Jupiter or Wotan—something that is no more ridiculous then believing in Yahweh however—to be pagan. Contemporary paganism does not consist of erecting altars to Apollo or reviving the worship of Odin. Instead it implies looking behind religion and, according to a now classic itinerary, seeking for the “mental equipment” that produced it, the inner world it reflects, and how the world it depicts as apprehended. In short, it consists of viewing the gods as “centers of value” and the beliefs they generate as value systems: gods and beliefs may pass away, but the values remain.”
― Alain de BenoistOn Being A Pagan

“For man to set himself up as man, means the adoption of a super-nature, a superior nature that is nothing other than culture whose effect is the emancipation of reflective consciousness from the repetitious constraints of the species. What this means especially is that man is given the possibility of going beyond himself and transforming. In other words, to ensure that each “super-nature” obtained is simply a step towards another “super-nature.” Now this project is the equivalent of making man a kind of god—allowing him to participate in the Divine—a perspective the Bible depicts as an “abomination.”
― Alain de BenoistOn Being A Pagan

“In aristocratic times what has value is priceless; in democratic times what is priceless has no value”  –Gómez Dávila

“Adam and Eve, placed in the garden of Eden, find themselves forbidden to eat of “the tree of the knowledge of good and evil” (Genesis 2:17). Catholic theologians believe this “knowledge” forbidden by Elohim-Yahweh is neither omniscience nor moral discernment, but the ability to decide what is good or evil. Jewish theology is more subtle. The “tree” of the knowledge is interpreted as the representation of a world where good and evil “are in a combined state,” where there is no absolute Good and Evil. In other words, the “tree” is a foreshadowing of the real world we live in, a world where nothing is absolutely clear cut, where moral imperatives are tied to human values, and where everything of any greatness and importance always takes place beyond good and evil. Furthermore, in the Hebrew tradition “to eat” means “to assimilate.” To eat of the tree of knowledge of good and evil is therefore to personally enter this real world where human initiative “combines” good and evil. Adam’s transgression, from which all the others are derived, is clearly “that of autonomy,” accordingly, as emphasized by Eisenberg and Abecassis, this would be “the desire to conduct his own history alone in according to his own desire and his own word or law.”
― Alain de BenoistOn Being A Pagan

“Each man must please himself, and nature has placed her approbation on this by supplying the greatest pleasure men ever know as a reward for doing good work. I hate this fast-growing tendency to chain men to machines in big factories and deprive them of all joy in their efforts — the plan will lead to cheap men and cheap products. I set my face against it and plead for the dignity and health of the open air, and the olden time.”

–Richard Wagner

“A High Culture reshapes entirely the economic practice of the populations upon whom it sets it’s grip; it reduces economics to the bottom of the pyramid of life. To a High Culture, economics has the same significance that the function of eating has to an individual.”

–Francis Parker Yockey

“The America Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.”

–Alexis de Tocqueville

“80% of everything that has ever been built in America has been built in the last 50 years. And most of it is brutal, depressing, ugly, unhealthy and spiritually degrading. The jot, plastic, commuter-tracked home wastelands. The Potemkin village shopping plazas, with their vast parking lagoons. The gourmet men’s sardonic junk food joints. The Orwellian office parks featuring buildings sheathed in the same reflective glass as the sunglasses worn by chain gang guards. The whole agoraphobia inducing toxic brutal spectacle that politicians like to call growth.”

–James Howard Kunstler in Radiant City

“I have nature and art and poetry, and if that is not enough, what is?”

Vincent van Gogh

The culture has, in general, settled for what is quick and what is cheap. Junk music, junk art, junk literature, junk thinking. Our culture is far too easily satisfied, far too easily entertained. Excellence, truth and beauty which used to be the triad of human virtues have been replaced by funny, cool and cute. And we get mediocrity by the boatload because we want it. Having welcomed it with open arms, we don’t just accept mediocrity, we crave it.”

–John MacArthur

“In nature, in its immanence, here and now, we find on the other hand answers to our anguish: “As leaves are born, so are men. The wind scatters the leaves on the ground, but the forest is green again in spring. So too with men: one generation is born as another is erased” (Iliad, VI, 146). The wheel of the seasons and life, each transmitting something of itself to those who will follow, thus assuring a measure of eternity.”

–Dominique Venner, The Homeric Triad

“Where are your valiant warriors and your priests, Where are your hunting parties and your feasts? Where is that warlike mien, and where are those Great armies that destroyed our country’s foes? … Count Persia as a ruin, as the lair Of lions and leopards. Look now and despair.”

–Ferdowsi – Shahnameh

“When it comes down to it, though, the real decision is inevitable: if one of us has to be destroyed, let’s make damn sure we’re the ones alive at the end. Our genes won’t let us decide any other way. Nature can’t evolve a species that hasn’t a will to survive. Individuals might be bred to sacrifice themselves, but the race as a whole can never decide to cease to exist.”

–Orson Scott Card, Ender’s Game (1985)

“In aristocratic times what has value is priceless; in democratic times what is priceless has no value.”

–Nicolás Gómez Dávila

“It is not a true civilization, and has nothing in it to satisfy a mature and fully developed human mind. It is attuned to the mentality of the galley-slave and the moron, and crushes relentlessly with disapproval, ridicule, and economic annihilation any sign of actually independent thought and civilised feeling which chances to rise above its sodden level. It is a treadmill, squirrel-trap culture – drugged and frenzied with the hashish of industrial servitude and material luxury. It is wholly a material body-culture, and its symbol is the tiled bathroom and steam radiator rather than the Doric portico and the temple of philosophy. Its denizens do not live or know how to live.”

–H.P. Lovecraft

“To study history means submitting to chaos and nevertheless retaining faith in order and meaning. It is a very serious task, young man, and possibly a tragic one.”

–Hermann Hesse, The Glass Bead Game

“In the whole vast dome of living nature there reigns an open violence. A kind of prescriptive fury which arms all the creatures to their common doom: as soon as you leave the inanimate kingdom you find the decree of violent death inscribed on the very frontiers of life. You feel it already in the vegetable kingdom: from the great catalpa to the humblest herb, how many plants die and how many are killed; but, from the moment you enter the animal kingdom, this law is suddenly in the most dreadful evidence. A Power, a violence, at once hidden and palpable… has in each species appointed a certain number of animals to devour the others… And who [in this general carnage] exterminates him who will exterminate all others? Himself. It is man who is charged with the slaughter of man… The whole earth, perpetually steeped in blood, is nothing but a vast altar upon which all that is living must be sacrificed without end, without measure, without pause, until the consummation of things, until evil is extinct, until the death of death.”

–Joseph de Maistre

“The intelligent poor individual was a much finer observer than the intelligent rich one. The poor individual looks around him at every step, listens suspiciously to every word he hears from the people he meets; thus, every step he takes presents a problem, a task, for his thoughts and feelings. He is alert and sensitive, he is experienced, his soul has been burned…”

Knut Hamsun, Hunger

 

“A sign which almost always accompanies the decadence of an aristocracy is the invasion of humanitarian sentiments and delicate “sob-stuff” which renders it incapable of defending its position. We must not confuse violence and force. Violence usually accompanies weakness. We can observe individuals and classes, who, having lost the force to maintain themselves in power, become more and more odious by resorting to indiscriminate violence. A strong man strikes only when it is absolutely necessary–and then nothing stops him. Trajan was strong but not violent; Caligula was violent but not strong.”

Vilfredo Pareto(via heartbloodspirit)

“People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in order to avoid facing their own souls. They will practice Indian yoga and all its exercises, observe a strict regimen of diet, learn the literature of the whole world – all because they cannot get on with themselves and have not the slightest faith that anything useful could ever come out of their own souls. Thus the soul has gradually been turned into a Nazareth from which nothing good can come.”

–Carl Jung, Psychology and Alchemy (1952)

“Here is the ultimate Tantric view of the world: nothing has to be done, nothing has to be attained. Everything is already perfect. The Self is already realized and can never be anything but realized, since it lies behind every thought, every breath, every moment and every experience of life. Everything is Shiva and Shiva alone.”

–Swami Shankarananda

“I could never find two people who are perfectly equal: one will always be more valuable than the other. And many people, as a matter of fact, simply have no value.”

–Pentti Linkola (Will Life Prevail?)

“The law of nature is harsh and immutable and in our estimation cruel. We may weep about it but nature never has and never will tolerate the survival of weaklings. If we have become a race of befuddled and sentimental nicompoops, then; despite our cherished culture, our incomprable science, our irresistible technology, our beautiful art and our profound learning, we shall go under and perish from the Earth. And if we go under, then despite all that we cherish and revere and despite the morality that is a peculiarity of our race and seems so high and noble to us, if we go under I sigh; “We shall have been weighed in the only balance that counts in this world and we shall have been found wanting. We shall have been proven an inferior species that biologically speaking had no right to survive. And when we are gone no man in aftertime will mourn our passing.” Like the Sybarites, who were in their day a people of superior culture until they became too advanced to defend themselves, we shall be remembered; if at all, with mockery and derision and we shall have richly deserved the contempt of our successors. For it is we, and not our enemies, who will have been the architects of our ruin and the executioners of ourselves and of our children and of all the posterity we might have had.”

–Dr. Revilo P. Oliver, Speech in Toronto, August 10, 1968

“Yes, there is perhaps more of Norse blood in your veins than you wot of, reader, whether you be English of Scotch; for these sturdy sea-rovers invaded our lands from north, south, east and west many a time in days gone by, and held it in possession for centuries at a time, leaving a lasting and beneficial impress on our customs and characters. We have good reason to regard their memory with respect and gratitude, despite their faults and sins, for much of what is good and true in our laws and social customs, much of what is manly and vigorous in the British Constitution, and much of our intense love of freedom and fair play, is due to the pith, pluck and enterprise, and sense of justice that dwelt in the breasts of the rugged old sea-kings of Norway!”

–R. M. Ballantyne, Erling the Bold: A Tale of Norse Sea-Kings

“When it comes to specifying the values particular to paganism, people have generally listed features such as these: an eminently aristocratic conception of the human individual; an ethics founded on honor (“shame” rather than “sin”); an heroic attitude toward life’s challenges; the exaltation and sacralization of the world, beauty, the body, strength, health; the rejection of any “worlds beyond”; the inseparability of morality and aesthetics; and so on. From this perspective, the highest value is undoubtedly not a form of “justice” whose purpose is essentially interpreted as flattening the social order in the name of equality, but everything that can allow a man to surpass himself. To paganism, it is pure absurdity to consider the results of the workings of life’s basic framework as unjust. In the pagan ethic of honor, the classic antithesis noble vs. base, courageous vs. cowardly, honorable vs. dishonorable, beautiful vs. deformed, sick vs. healthy, and so forth, replace the antithesis operative in a morality based on the concept of sin: good vs. evil, humble vs. vainglorious, submissive vs. proud, weak vs. arrogant, modest vs. boastful, and so on. However, while all this appears to be accurate, the fundamental feature in my opinion is something else entirely. It lies in the denial of dualism.”
― Alain de BenoistOn Being A Pagan

“Collapse in itself would not lead to a cultural or emotional shift; people wouldn’t suddenly want to live a small-scale peaceful life at one with nature, they would want to get back what they had lost, because they hadn’t been convinced before they lost that in was not worth having.”

–Paul Kingsnorth

“The reality is that we have used the short-term boost of fossil fuels to give us a 200 year party, which is now coming to an end in a haze of broken bottles, hangovers and recrimination.”

–Paul Kingsnorth

“The scientific method is invaluable for understanding the physical properties of the world. No question. But there are any number of ways of seeing the world. The material is only one of them, poetry for example, can tell you things about being human that an understanding of brain chemistry never could. Science and art do very different things. Science can never replace art, mysticism, myth or religion because it is not asking the same questions. Each has their place as a way of seeing. Poets cannot replace scientists and vice versa. Science is good; scientific / materialist dogmatism is not. I find that the two are often confused with each other”

–Paul Kingsnorth

“The true philosophical Act is annihilation of self (Selbsttodtung); this is the real beginning of all Philosophy.”

–Novalis

“Do not try to be pretty. You weren’t meant to be pretty; you were meant to burn down the earth and graffiti the sky. Don’t let anyone ever simplify you to just “pretty.”

Always learn poems by heart. They have to become the marrow in your bones. Like fluoride in the water, they’ll make your soul impervious to the world’s soft decay.By Janet Fitch


“The Sadist desires to inflict stronger sensations, but desires that it should be felt as Love. The Masochist desires to experience stronger sensations, but desires that it should be inflicted with Love. “

I don’t mind living in a man’s world as long as I can be a woman in it.”

“My womanhood is not delicate or generous. It is a snarling, wounded animal caged in gleaming bars of pride and hidden away in the blackest part of my heart. It is wily and ruthless and jealous of the company it keeps, and it bleeds day and night from a secret, raw need for the worthy one. It waits in the dark and howls out a lament for the one with a muzzle in one pocket and bandages in another, the man with teeth like knives and eyes full of starlight.

I am a pillar of light and flame bottled up tight against intruders, and no man may open me or he will burn. Kisses from these lips are curses to the boys that steal them, and any one who looks at me too lingeringly calls down destruction upon himself, as though I am this century’s arc of the covenant. Why? Because I already belong to a bountifully cruel man with tenderness only for me. He is the super-massive black hole at the center of my universe, drawing me closer with every second of these lonely nights and shuddering in anticipation for the day when he may swallow me up. On that day, he will come for the girl who thrills at silk scares around her wrists and a kingdom at her feet, and I will kneel for he who fears nothing but the curve of my mouth, the sound of my smallest whisper. I will wander through the halls of his heart with bare feet and loose hair, unafraid of what I might find there, and he will put the animal in me at rest with gentle words and firm hands. Together, we will make this world tremble.

So do not touch me, brother mine, or we will make you understand what it is to burn.”

–S.T. Gibson

“We deplore that democracy surrenders itself to politicians, but from its own point of view, a point of view which it cannot avoid taking up, it is absolutely right. What is a politician? He is a man who, in respect of his personal opinions, is a nullity, in respect of education, a mediocrity, he shares the general sentiments and passions of the crowd, his sole occupation is politic, and if that career were closed to him, he would die of starvation. He is precisely the thing of which the democracy has need.”
Émile Faguet

“This is how queen kill, I suppose. With a voice that does not quaver, with eyes stripped bare of mercy, with justice by her own decree. Exile. The absence of home, a fatal unmooring. The fate of treacherous Egyptian girls with eyes that run men through and schemes that seek to supplant their mistresses. My heart, Father, is faltering and steeped in pity. I must clothe it in resolve and put on the armor of war. I am to be a mother of nations, and this what my station demands.

They will die out there, I suppose, beautiful dark Hagar with her oiled plaits and slim hips, that little boy of hers gulping down dust and crying out for rest. There is no Nile here. She couldn’t carry enough water had she as many arms as her people have gods. The jackals will have their bones stripped of flesh in a day, left for the sands to scrub clean and the sun to bleach white. I will fumigate the tent free of the memory of her voice, bury her idols deep in the desert, and drive out Abraham’s love for her with kisses and soft speech. This household will know order again. I will ensure it.

In the old stories, kingdoms are built on bloodletting. I thought you more faithful than Ishtar, wiser than Baal, but perhaps all gods delight in lapping up the blood of fealty offerings… Perhaps this is the sacrifice you require of me. Your favor has been so far from us for so long I have forgotten the sound of my name from your lips. You promised us plains of milk and honey and the sands of the seas, you promised to call down the stars and line my womb with constellations. Will nothing but the slaughter of a foolish girl-child send your spirit rushing back into this house? See Father, how swift and cold I am with her. See how I punished her insolence, her idleness and haughty spirit. I am fit to rule, Beloved, I am capable of managing the flourishing household you promised me. Return to us, El Shaddi, come to us like rain to coax forth crops from the barren field. Inflame Abraham’s failing eyes with your glory once more, steady these withered hands and fortify these brittle bones for childbearing.

In my youth you came to me in dreams, called me blessed in the stir of the wind and anointed me with stately beauty like dew atop a lily. You named me princess and gave me a beautiful, wild, God-touched man for a King. What am I now? A bitter, barren old woman more ready to put her handmaiden to death than her own jealous spirit. Am I to bear the guilt of this? Will the children you insist will come revere their mother as a murderer? Will Hagar’s fleeting smile and Abraham’s knowing eyes gazing back at me from that innocent child’s face haunt me until the ends of my days? Oh Father, what sort of creature have I become?

El Shaddai, send her back to me. I will welcome her with bread and wine, I will fall to my knees and bathe her bleeding feet with cassia oil, I will kiss her hands in penitence and gather Ishmael to my breast as though he were my own. I will never strike her or send her off to draw water in the dark again, I will yield my spot in Abrahams’s bed and dress the boy in tunics I wove with another name in mind. I will do anything Lord, lower myself to her station even, only do not let her die. I give her my crown, Father. If it is in your will for her to be the fountainhead from which your glory springs, so be it. I no longer deserve that. I never did. I am at peace with all things, Lover of my youth. If your will welcomes her, let it be.”.

–S.T. Gibson, Lamentation of Sarah

“Peter’s not coming, darling.
You can latch the window and take the white ribbons from your hair,
stop sleeping with socks on and packing going-away bags.
Whispering the names of the lost boys will not hasten them to you.
Clapping your hands is no enchantment.
There is magic, though, in lining your eyes,
and spells to be cast in sharpening your tongue.
Come to me, darling, and I’ll show you how queens carry themselves.
I will teach you how to wrangle womanhood and tame it into a lapdog,
to recognize pirates without their hooks and rapier them with words,
to say no to heartless boys who need mothering
and make peace with stern princesses and jealous faeries.
I will help hide away childhood in the gilded cage of your ribs,
where it may blossom and thrive in the wildest part of you.
Here you will never grow old, never die.
Here is your Neverland, laced through your heart like corset strings,
tied up tight into a ribbon no span of years can unravel.”

–S.T. Gibson, To Growing Girls Who Dream of Neverland

“They will tell you that you must shut your eyes against the dark,
that untouched skin and unlived years are their own reward,
that unicorns don’t come calling on girls who have tasted blood.
But I tell you, innocence is no virtue.
Virtue is a hard-won thing.
It is the bullets meant to kill you that you swallowed instead,
the ones that clink in your stomach when you toss and turn at night.
Goodness is an albatross, heavy around your neck and often shot down,
principles are old knife wounds, flaring up to demand attention,
and integrity is being martyred a thousand times over,
each time as dirty and raw and worthy as the last.
These things call for bleeding and breathing and taking up space.
These things are not found crushed between the pages of stories
not your own like the first blossoms of spring.
They will tell you that you must stay innocent, dear heart,
but innocence is not dining on enough of the world to become wise
and never needing to be clever or learning how to be shrewd.
Innocence is being pulled under by the weight of your skirts
and not knowing how to rage against the water rushing in.
Innocence is weeping over a unicorn’s bloody hide,
because you never suspected men only wanted it for its horn.”

–S.T. Gibson, To Girls Who Wait on Unicorns

“Here’s to the angels from alpha centauri,
the ones who appear with a rush of wings and sonic boom,
beating the burnt ozone and atomized rocket fuel from their robes.
Here’s to seraphs with voices like artificial interfaces,
who come wielding blades doused in kerosene
and bearing gifts of titanium and chrome.
Here’s to all the cosmonauts
flashing be not afraid on halogen readouts,
planting quantum physics behind your eyelids
and feeding you electric gospels through an I.V. drip.
Here’s to their joints,
whirring and clicking as they trail
scriptures and new sciences down your spine
with trembling gold-capped fingertips.
Here’s to their breath,
(the cold kiss of dry ice)
swirling through your hair
with the comet dustings and asteroid bits.
Here’s to the angels, many-winged and mighty,
and to you, polishing their lidless eyes
and gifting them hologram prayers
a kissing any part of them that rusts.”

–S.T. Gibson, The Angels from Alpha Centauri

“Paganism does not reproach Christianity for defending the weak who are unjustly oppressed. It reproaches it for exalting them in their weakness and viewing it as the sign of their election and their title to glory; it reproaches Christianity for not helping them to become strong. So it is not a question of opposing the strong versus the weak—today, in any event, it is paganism that is weak and Judeo-Christian monotheism that is strong—but purely and simply of opposing a system of remaining weak with a system of becoming strong.

It is also a question of making a world that is not a vale of tears, nor a theater of shadows, nor a stage where man with erratic happiness acts out his salvation, but the natural field of self-expansion for a man capable of asserting his autonomy and establishing himself as his own project.” – Alain de Benoist

“In modern states, the citizen is politically impotent. A citizen, it is true, may complain, make suggestions, or cause disruptions, but in the ancient world these were privileges that belonged to any slave.”

–Mark Mirabello

“Morality has become so complex and contradictory because its values no longer constitute themselves in the order of life but have crystallized in a transcendental region only feebly connected to life’s vital and irrational forces. How does one go about founding a morality?

I’m so sick of the word “good”; it is so stale and vapid! Morality tells you to work for the triumph of goodness! And how? Through the fulfillment of one’s duties, respect, sacrifice. These are just empty words: in front of naked reality, moral principles are void, so much so that one wonders whether life without them would not be preferable.”

–Cioran

“At the heart of any viable and enduring society will always be agriculture, including all secondary sources of livelihood like gardening, cultivation, gathering, fishing and hunting. Any society that has severed the link between the majority of the population and the basic foundations of life – green leaves, soil, earth and water – is destined to collapse.”

–Pentti Linkola, ‘Can Life Prevail?’

“Of all manly enterprises, I admire that of the person who breaks the law imposed by others and establishes his own law.”

–Gabriele d’Annunzio

”In a millennium or two, a seeming paradox of our civilisation will be best understood by those men versed in the methods of counter-archaeology. They will study us not by digging into the earth but by climbing vast dunes of industrial rubble and mutilated steel, seeking to reach the tops of our buildings. Here they’ll chip lovingly at our spires, mansards, turrets, parapets, belfries, water tanks, flower pots, pigeon lofts and chimneys.

I turned south on Broadway.
Scaling our masonry they will identify the encrustations of twentieth-century, art and culture, decade by decade, each layer simple enough to compare with the detritus at ground level – our shattered bank vaults, cash registers, safes, locks, electrified alarm systems and armoured vehicles. Back in their universities in the earth, the counter-archaeologists will sort their reasons for our demise, citing as prominent the fact that we stored our beauty in the air, for birds of prey to see, while placing at eye level nothing more edifying than hardware, machinery and the implements of torture.”

– Don DeLillo, ‘Great Jones Street’

“It envisages, as its name implies, a nation organised as the human body. Every part fulfills its function as a member of the whole, performing its separate task, and yet, by performing it, contributing to the welfare of the whole. The whole body is generally directed by the central driving brain of government without which no body and system of society can operate.”

–Oswald Mosley

“I would rather spend eternity in Hell with my ancestors than in heaven with a pack of beggars.” –King Redbad of Frisia

“To enable men to act with the weight and character of a people —- we must suppose them to be in that state of habitual social discipline in which the wiser, the more expert and the more fortunate conduct and by conducting protect the weaker, the less knowing, and the less provided with the goods of fortune

—- To be bred in a place of estimation; to see nothing low and sordid from one’s infancy; to be taught to respect oneself; to have leisure to read, to reflect, to converse; to be enabled to draw the court and attention of the wise and learned wherever they are to be found; to be habituated in armies to command and obey —- these are the circumstances of men that form a natural aristocracy without which there is no nation.”

–Edmund Burke

“I would rather spend eternity in Hell with my ancestors than in heaven with a pack of beggars.”

–King Redbad of Frisia

“Few beings have ever been so impregnated, pierced to the core, by the conviction of the absolute futility of human aspiration. The universe is nothing but a furtive arrangement of elementary particles. A figure in transition toward chaos. That is what will finally prevail. The human race will disappear. Other races in turn will appear and disappear. T

he skies will be glacial and empty, traversed by the feeble light of half-dead stars. These too will disappear. Everything will disappear. And human actions are as free and as stripped of meaning as the unfettered movement of the elementary particles. Good, evil, morality, sentiments? Pure “Victorian fictions”. All that exists is egotism. Cold, intact and radiant.”

-houellebecq

We need women who are so strong they can be gentle, so educated they can be humble, so fierce they can be compassionate, so passionate they can be rational, and so disciplined they can be free.By Kavita Ramdas

I am a demanding creature. I am selfish and cruel and extremely unreasonable. But I am your servant. When you starve, I will feed you; when you are sick I will tend you. I crawl at your feet; for before your love, your kisses, I am debased. For you alone I will be weak.By Koschei the Deathless (Deathless by Catherynne M. Valente) 

The ground is hateful for swallowing your smiles,
it has done nothing to earn that honor.
I’d tear out the throat of any man 
if that meant the glint of your teeth turned towards me.By S.T.Gibson

“‘A man should be proud of suffering. All suffering is a reminder of our high estate.’ Fine! Eighty years before Nietzsche. But that is not the sentence I meant. Wait a moment, here I have it. This: ‘Most men will not swim before they are able to.’ Is not that witty? Naturally, they won’t swim! They are born for the solid earth, not for the water. And naturally they won’t think. They are made for life, not for thought. Yes, and he who thinks, what’s more, he who makes thought his business, he may go far in it, but he has bartered the solid earth for the water all the same, and one day he will drown.”

Hermann Hesse

“The world must be romanticized. In this way the originary meaning may be found again. Romanticizing is nothing but a quantitative potentiation. In this process, the lower self is identified with a better self. Just as we are such a qualitative series of powers. This process is still wholly unknown. To the extent that I give a high meaning to the common, a mysterious aspect to the habitual, an infinite appearance to the finite, the dignity of the unknown to the known, I am romanticizing it. —The operation for the higher, the unknown, the mystical, the infinite, is the reverse …”

–Novalis

“Illich’s critique of technology, like Kaczynski’s, was really a critique of power. Advanced technologies, he explained, created dependency; they took tools and processes out of the hands of individuals and put them into the metaphorical hands of organizations. The result was often “modernized poverty,” in which human individuals became the equivalent of parts in a machine rather than the owners and users of a tool. In exchange for flashing lights and throbbing engines, they lost the things that should be most valuable to a human individual: Autonomy. Freedom. Control.”

–Paul Kingsnorth

“Personally, I increasingly see this as a spiritual crisis. I think that the Empire of the Ape is a creation primarily of a culture which has no values at its core beyond the pursuit of material wealth, and a culture which cannot see nonhuman life in anything other than utilitarian terms. I wonder if there has been a culture in history before whose institutions and worldview and morality and ethics was so thoroughly, deeply impregnated with the values of commerce. It seems to me that if we have no language to speak in other than the language of money and the language of ‘objective’, morality-free science, then the destruction of nonhuman nature in pursuit of our own interests is almost an inevitable result.”

–Paul Kingsnoth

Monotheism lacks all mystery and nature is made plausible through being a creation of ‘God’, these types of religion spread because they neglect the natural environment of the follower, the god is outside of our world, and thus nature is insensate. Modernity and monotheism, being the antithesis of the pre-Christian values of heroism and wildness (see Nietzsche’s ‘Anti-Christ’), work well together in their neglect of nature – existing inside safe, man-made structures and man-made dogmas which are therefore transferable across nations, free of the identity and mystery that your homeland offers, better yet – imposes.

In my experience, attachment to ones heritage within a nation suffering from identity failure is the seed of neo-tribalism – a natural urge to belong and have a rewarding, worthwhile trade and role within your community, a community that shares intrinsic beliefs and worldview. This urge is not being satisfied in modern society, we have become infantile and solitary – alienated from our surroundings and terrified of discomfort. It is a dangerous thing to be united, to have an alliance outside of Government influence where loyalty and brotherhood are principal and the group is impossible to infiltrate, where you rely on each other for support and subsistence. So folk tradition is demonized, identity is pre-packed and our religions are anti-spiritual. Tribalism is a result that our society fears, so our political and social rulers attempt to suck your very individuality from you and create a world community, by encouraging homogeneity and mediocrity through adherence to modern culture.

However, one should take consolation from the words of Julius Evola:

“One should not become fixated on the present and on things at hand, but keep in view the conditions that may come about in the future. Thus the principle to follow could be that of letting the forces and processes of this epoch take their own course, while keeping oneself firm and ready to intervene when ‘the tiger, which cannot leap on the person riding it, is tired of running.”

By reducing your involvement in modern culture, and stepping out into the wilderness around you, you may begin to nurture an inherent love and relationship with the land, opening yourself to wild and ‘wyrd’ and perhaps realising that the ever unpopular folk culture of your ancestors is an innate paganism. The aforementioned structures, both spiritually and physically that divide us from the natural world will eventually fall, the meek will not inherit the Earth – and you will meet your maker: the wilderness – unflinching and unconcerned by your offence to her natural law; unaffected by the illusory citadel you’ve assembled about yourself forged of social ideals and romanticised concepts of entitlement.

Lucy Fraser, Identity & European Religion

“As only God has an absolute value, everything that is not God can have only relative value. To be created means that one’s being is not due to oneself but to something other than oneself. This creates a perpetual sense of self-loss within one’s own state of unfulfillment. It means that one is not self-sufficient but a dependent being—one’s state of existence is caged from the start inside that dependency. Creation therefore does not posit man’s autonomy. It circumscribes it, and by virtue of this, in my opinion, invalidates it.
Indeed, man has no right to enjoy this world except on condition of acknowledging that he is not its true owner but at best its steward. Yahweh alone is the owner of the world. “The earth belongs to me, and you are nothing but strangers and guests to my eyes” (Leviticus 25:23).”

― Alain de BenoistOn Being A Pagan

The Christian hero was the martyr, for as in the Jewish tradition, the highest achievement was to give one’s life for God or for one’s fellow beings. The martyr is the exact opposite of the pagan hero personified in the Greek and Germanic heroes. The heroes’ aim was to conquer, to be victorious, to destroy, to rob; their fulfillment of life was pride, power, fame, and superior skill in killing (St. Augustine compared Roman history with that of a band of robbers). For the pagan hero a man’s worth lay in his prowess in attaining and holding onto power, and he gladly died on the battlefield in the moment of victory. Homer’s Iliad is the poetically magnificent description of glorified conquerors and robbers. The martyr’s characteristics are being, giving, sharing; the hero’s, having, exploiting, forcing.”

–Alain de Benoist

 
Dominique Venner: Living in Accordance with Our Tradition

Every great people possesses a primordial tradition that is different from all others. It is the past and the future, the world of the depths, the bedrock that supports, the source from which one may draw as one sees fit. It is the stable axis at the center of the turning wheel of change. As Hannah Arendt put it, it is the “authority that chooses and names, transmits and conserves, indicates where the treasures are to be found and what their value is.”

This dynamic conception of tradition is different from the Guénonian notion of a single, universal and hermetic tradition, which is supposedly common to all peoples and all times, and which originates in a revelation from an unidentified “beyond”. That such an idea is decidedly ahistorical has not bothered its theoreticians. In their view, the world and history, for three or for thousand years, is no more than a regression, a fatal involution, the negation of of the world of what they call “tradition”, that of a golden age inspired by the Vedic and Hesiodic cosmologies. One must admit that the anti-materialism of this school is stimulating. On the other hand, its syncretism is ambiguous, to the point of leading some of its adepts, and not the least of them, to convert to Islam. Moreover, its critique of modernity has only lead to an admission of impotence. Unable to go beyond an often legitimate critique and propose an alternative way of life, the traditionalist school has taken refuge in an eschatological waiting for catastrophe. (1) That which is thinking of a high standard in Guénon or Evola, sometimes turns into sterile rhetoric among their disciples. (2) Whatever reservations we may have with regard to the  Evola’s claims, we will always be indebted to him for having forcefully shown, in his work, that beyond all specific religious references,  there is a spiritual path of tradition that is opposed to the materialism of which the Enlightenment was an expression. Evola was not only a creative thinker, he also proved, in his own life, the heroic values that he had developed in his work.

In order to avoid all confusion with the ordinary meaning of the old traditionalisms, however respectable they might be, we suggest a neologism, that of “traditionism”.

For Europeans, as for other peoples, the authentic tradition can only be their own. That is the tradition that opposes nihilism through the return to the sources specific to the European ancestral soul. Contrary to materialism, tradition does not explain the higher through the lower, ethics through heredity, politics through interests, love through sexuality. However, heredity has its part in ethics and culture, interest has its part in politics, and sexuality has its part in love. However, tradition orders them in a hierarchy. It constructs personal and collective existence from above to below. As in the allegory in Plato’s “Timaeus”, the sovereign spirit, relying on the courage of the heart, commands the appetites. But that does not mean that the spirit and the body can be separated. In the same way, authentic love is at once a communion of souls and a carnal harmony.

Tradition is not an idea. It is a way of being and of living, in accordance with the Timaeus’ precept that “the goal of human life is to establish order and harmony in one’s body and one’s soul, in the image of the order of the cosmos.” Which means that life is a path towards this goal.

In the future, the desire to live in accordance with our tradition will be felt more and more strongly, as the chaos of nihilism is exacerbated. In order to find itself again, the European soul, so often straining towards conquests and the infinite, is destined to return to itself through an effort of introspection and knowledge. Its Greek and Apollonian side, which are so rich, offers a model of wisdom in finitude, the lack of which will become more and more painful. But this pain is necessary. One must pass through the night to reach the dawn.

For Europeans, living according to their tradition first of all presupposes an awakening of consciousness, a thirst for true spirituality, practiced through personal reflection while in contact with a superior thought. One’s level of education does not constitute a barrier. “The learning of many things”, said Heraclitus, “does not teach understanding”. And he added: “To all men is granted the ability to know themselves and to think rightly.” One must also practice meditation, but austerity is not necessary. Xenophanes of Colophon even provided the following pleasant instructions: “One should hold such converse by the fire-side in the winter season, lying on a soft couch, well-fed, drinking sweet wine, nibbling peas: ‘Who are you among men, and where from?” Epicurius, who was more demanding, recommended two exercises: keeping a journal and imposing upon oneself a daily examination of conscience. That was what the stoics practiced. With the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius, they handed down to us the model for all spirtual exercises.

Taking notes, reading, re-reading, learning, repeating daily a few aphorisms from an author associated with the tradition, that is what provides one with a point of support. Homer or Aristotle, Marcus Aurelius or Epictetus, Montaigne or Nietzsche, Evola or Jünger, poets who elevate and memorialists who incite to distance. The only rule is to choose that which elevates, while enjoying one’s reading.

To live in accordance with tradition is to conform to the ideal that it embodies, to cultivate excellence in relation to one’s nature, to find one’s roots again, to transmit the heritage, to stand united with one’s own kind. It also means driving out nihilism from oneself, even if one must pretend to pay tribute to a society that remains subjugated by nihilism through the bonds of desire. This implies a certain frugality, imposing limits upon oneself in order to liberate oneself from the chains of consumerism. It also means finding one’s way back to the poetic perception of the sacred in nature, in love, in family, in pleasure and in action. To live in accordance with tradition also means giving a form to one’s existence, by being one’s own demanding judge, one’s gaze turned towards the awakened beauty of one’s heart, rather than towards the ugliness of a decomposing world.

(1) Generally speaking, the pessimism intrinsic to counter-revolutionary thought – from which Evola distinguishes himself – comes from a fixation with form (political and social institutions), to the detriment of the essence of things (which persist behind change).

(2) The academic Marco Tarchi, who has for a long time been interested in Evola, has criticized in him a sterile discourse peopled by dreams of “warriors” and “aristocrats” (cf. the journal “Vouloir”, Bruxelles, january-february 1991. This journal is edited by the philologist Robert Steuckers).

Now, what does Nietzsche believe? He believes that strength is moral glory. That courage is the highest form of morality. That life is hierarchical. That everything’s elitist. There’s a hierarchy in each individual. And a hierarchy in every group of individuals. There’s a hierarchy between groups of individuals. Inequality is what right-wing ideas really mean.

Right-wing ideas aren’t just a bit of flag-waving and baiting a few Muslims. Right-wing ideas are spiritually about inequality. The left loves equality. It believes we’re all the same. We must be treated the same. And they believe that as a morality. As a moral good which will be imposed.

Under communism, Pol Pot shot everyone who’d read book that he didn’t approve of. Why did he do that? Because he wanted everyone to be the same, and everyone to think in the same way. Asiatics have a formal description. It’s called the tall poppy syndrome. They look at the plants. They decide one’s a bit out of kilter. It’s standing higher than the others, so you snip it down, so all are the same.

Pol Pot’s not his real name by the way. It’s a joke name; it means “political potential.” When he was very young, Maoists wrote down, “This man has political potential.” “Pol Pot.” And that’s where he took it from. This man is a terroristic psychopath. But when he took over his society with a teenage militia high on drugs, and almost everything had been blitzed and was defenseless, he put into practice in a cardinal way, what many of these Western idiots in the 60s with their fists in the air have been proposing. He sat in Paris, in salons listening to Kristeva, listening to Sartre, listening to de Beauvoir. And he imposed it implacably like the cretin he was. The family is immoral. Shoot all the village priests that got people married. Shoot people who are bit too keen on marriage. Shoot everyone who’s read books about marriage. Shoot everybody who ever said marriage is a good thing. That’s quite a pile of bodies, and you haven’t started yet.

That is communism in its rawest and its crudest form. It’s a sort of morality of bestiality, essentially. And it can’t even impose equality, because in the communist societies of yesteryear, the elite will have its own shops, and its own channels, and they will have their own corrupt systems to keep their children out of military service, and so on. Just like Clinton’s America, or Vietnam America before it. Every elite in that sense will recompose, despite the stigma.

Inequality is the truth. Because nature is unjust, but also fair in its injustice. Because there’s always a balance. People who are very gifted in one area will have grotesque weaknesses in another. People who are strong in one area will be weak in another. People who are at the bottom within a hierarchy have a role and have a place in a naturally ordered society. And will be looked after, because patriotism really is the only socialism. That’s why the right appeals to all parties. And to all groups within a culture. Because all have a place.

–Jonathan Bowden, Credo: A Nietzschean Testament
Advertisements